1st Grade - Compare Using Estimations

 
     
 
     
 
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1st
Comparisons
Compare Using Estimations
Make reasonable estimates when comparing larger or smaller numbers.
The student will be able to make a realistic estimate when comparing larger and smaller numbers.
 

Sample Problems

(1)

What is an estimate? (a close guess to the actual number)

(2)

Look at the pictures below. Circle the picture that is closer to the number 15.

(3)

Look at the pictures below. Circle the picture that is closer to the number 59.

(4)

Look at the pictures below. Circle the picture that is closer to the number 3.

(5)

Look at the pictures below. Circle the picture that is closer to the number 25.

Learning Tips

(1)

Estimating Jar: Find a medium sized jar. Fill it with some of your child’s favorite candy. Ask them to estimate (make a good guess) about how many pieces of candy are in the jar. Ask each member of your family to write down a guess as to how many pieces of candy are in the jar. At the end of the week, look at each guess, then count the actual number of pieces that are in the jar. Discuss the estimates made and if they were reasonable or not. You can vary this activity by changing the size and shape of the jar.

(2)

Everyday Estimating Experiences: There are wonderful opportunities all around us to help review the concept of estimating. When you go to the grocery store ask your child to assist in helping to get various items. Ask them estimating questions to obtain which product you would like. (Example: Which bag looks like to would contain 5 chips or 50 chips? I want the bag that has 50 chips.) You can also ask your child to estimate different object in your environment (Estimate how many cars you think are in the parking lot.) Almost everywhere you look you can find an opportunity to estimate. By continuing to practice this skill in this way, your child may begin to initiate estimating problems on their own.

(3)

Estimate While Cooking: Cooking is a wonderful opportunity to explore the concept of estimating. The next time you are cooking in the kitchen, invite your child to join you. Share the recipe with them and have them estimate the amounts of your ingredients. After you have discussed their estimate, actually measure the ingredients and compare the estimate and the actual measurement. Discuss why their estimate was reasonable or not. If their estimate was not reasonable discuss why it was not and ask them to try again with the next ingredient in the recipe.

(4)

Draw and Estimate: For this activity you will need a white board, markers, an eraser, and number flashcards. On the white board draw a picture of an object, such as a jar with candy inside, a bag with food inside, or a box with dog bones inside. Next, pull out three number cards. One of the number cards will represent a number that is close to the number of items pictured in the drawing. The other two cards should be numbers that are not close to the number of items in the drawing. After you have drawn the picture and pulled out the number cards, ask your child to look at the picture, estimate the number of items shown, and then locate the number card that shows the best estimate for the picture. You can take turns with this activity and have them draw a picture and pull the cards for you to estimate as well.

(5)

Which one has more? For this activity, you will need to gather a variety of containers in different sizes and shapes. Set out the different containers in front of your child. Provide them with verbal scenarios and ask them to identify a container to fit each scenario. For example you may say, “I have 50 jelly beans, which container can I put them in?” Have your child point to an appropriate sized container. Next you would say, “ Now I have 5 jelly beans, which container should I use?” Have them identify a different container. Compare the differences in containers and discuss the differences (small container for smaller amount, larger container for larger amount). Continuing this type of practice will assist children in reinforcing small amount means a smaller number and a larger amount means a larger number.

Extra Help Problems

(1)

Estimate how many toys you have in your room.

(2)

Look at the pictures below. Circle the picture that is closest to 100.

(3)

Estimate how many cars are parked on your street.

(4)

Look at the pictures below. Circle the picture that is closest to 2.

(5)

Estimate how many kids go to your school.

(6)

Look at the pictures below. Circle the picture that is closest to 85.

(7)

Estimate how many movies you watch per month.

(8)

Look at the pictures below. Circle the picture that is closest to 12.

(9)

Make an estimate of how much milk your entire family drinks in one month.

(10)

Look at the pictures below. Circle the picture that is closest to 70

(11)

Estimate how many leaves are in a tree outside.

(12)

Look at the pictures below. Circle the picture that is closest to 26.

(13)

Estimate how many books are in your school’s library.

(14)

Look at the pictures below. Circle the picture that is closest to 63.

(15)

Estimate how many books you have at home.

(16)

Look at the pictures below. Circle the picture that is closest to 44.

(17)

Estimate how many shirts everyone in your family has.

(18)

Look at the pictures below. Circle the picture that is closest to 18.

(19)

Estimate how many pairs of shoes everyone in your house has all together.

(20)

Look at the pictures below. Circle the picture that is closest to 5.

(21)

Estimate how many kids at school buy their lunch.

(22)

Look at the pictures below. Circle the picture that is closest to 1000.

(23)

Estimate how many kids at school bring their lunch.

(24)

Look at the pictures below. Circle the picture that is closest to 21

(25)

Estimate how many kids in your class like chocolate.

 

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