1st Grade - Compare Objects And Measurements

 
     
 
     
 
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1st
Shapes and Geometry
Compare Objects and Measurements
Compare the length, width, and volume of two or more object using direct comparison or nonstandard units.
The student will be able to compare the length (how long), the width (how wide, and the volume (space inside of a shape) of objects. They will be able to do this using standard tool of measurement (rulers, measuring cups) and nonstandard units (cubes, rice, shoes, paper clips) to measure the objects.
 

Sample Problems

(1)

What is length? (how long something is)

(2)

What is width? (how wide something is)

(3)

What is volume? (how much space is inside the shape)

(4)

What tool do we use to measure length and width? (a ruler)

(5)

Name one tool we can use to measure volume. (a measuring cup)

Learning Tips

(1)

Kitchen Fun: The kitchen is a great place to practice this skill. Take out a variety of containers. Try to use ones that are different shapes and sizes. You can also use uncooked rice for this activity. Ask your child to examine to different containers. Review what volume is (space inside of a shape). Ask them to identify which container has the most volume (most space inside) and which container has the least amount of volume (smallest amount of space inside). Use these two containers and the uncooked rice to determine the volume. Have your child guess how many cups of rice it will take to fill each container. Discuss their guess and the actual number cups used. Next, repeat the activity, but use uncooked pasta. Ask your child to guess again. Compare the number of cups of rice to the number of cups of pasta. Discuss any differences.

(2)

Outdoor Arena: There are so many objects outside that will help reinforce this skill. Take any opportunity that you see to discuss volume, length, and width. Filling up buckets for washing cars, trash cans, or flower pots are all great for discussing volume. You can give your child a tape measure or ruler and ask them to measure the length of different objects and then compare which ones are longer or wider. Have them measure a variety of things. Skateboards, mailboxes, flower boxes, and cars are just some examples of things to measure. The possibilities are endless with this activity!

(3)

Bedroom Measures: Have your child begin this activity by drawing and labeling a map of their bedroom. Next provide them with a yard stick, an inch ruler, and one of their shoes. Ask them to measure the length or width of each object that they labeled on their map. Ask them to measure each item with all 3 of the tools provided (yard stick, ruler, and shoe). Have them record their measurements on their map. They can use a different color for each tool. When you child has made all of their measurements and recorded their data, discuss their findings. Compare the different tools they used. This would also be a wonderful opportunity to discuss both standard and nonstandard units of measurement.

(4)

Real Life Experiences: Measurement is a skill that can be easily practiced and discussed almost anywhere. When you are in a store you can ask your child to identify objects that are longer, shorter, or wide. This is a great way to build their measurement vocabulary. You can also discuss different types of containers and the amount of volume that they contain. Ask your child to identify which container contains more volume and which container contains less. Provide your child with a small notebook that they can keep in your car. Have them track the items that they identify, for length and volume, inside their notebook.

(5)

Measurement and Volume Challenge: This is a challenge that the entire family can participate in. At the beginning of the week post three pieces of paper. They should be titled “Longest” and “Widest” and “Most Volume.” Challenge each person in your home to find an object that is the longest, the widest, and contains the most volume. Have each person draw a picture of their object on the corresponding sheet of paper. On the last night of the week, compare the objects that each person found. Discuss which object is the longest, widest, and which one contains the most volume. You can also discuss standard and nonstandard units of measurement.

Extra Help Problems

(1)

Look at the pictures of the two measuring cups below. Circle the one that contains more volume.

(2)

Draw a picture of two rectangles in the space below. Color the longest rectangle red.

(3)

Look at the pictures of the two cars below. Draw an X on the car that is longer.

(4)

Draw a picture of two different bowls. In the bowl that has the most volume, draw your favorite ice cream.

(5)

Look at the pictures below. Color the flower pot that contains the least (smallest) amount of volume or space inside of its container. Draw a flower inside this pot.

(6)

Draw a picture of two shoe boxes. Draw a shoe inside of the box that contains the most volume.

(7)

Look at the pictures below. Circle the picture of the ladder that is the longest.

(8)

Draw a picture of two fire trucks. Color the fire truck that is the longest, red.

(9)

Look at the pictures of the two doors. Circle the door that is the widest.

(10)

Draw a picture of two pitchers. Draw pink lemonade in the pitcher that contains the most volume.

(11)

Look at the pictures below. Circle the can of soup that contains the most volume.

(12)

Draw a picture of two different pillows. Draw a circle around the pillow that is the widest and place an X on the pillow that is the longest.

(13)

Look at the pictures below. Draw a square around the slide that will give you the longest ride.

(14)

Draw a picture of two books. Using an inch ruler, measure to see how wide each book is.

(15)

Using the same picture of your two books, write the number of inches wide, inside of each book.

(16)

After you have written the number of inches wide inside of each book, trace the edges of the book that is the widest, blue.

(17)

Look at the pictures of the two houses below. Using your inch ruler, measure to see how long ach house is.

(18)

Using the same pictures of the two houses, write the number of inches long inside of each house.

(19)

After you have written the number of inches long on each house, you will need to color the house that is the longest.

(20)

Draw a picture of two submarine sandwiches. Using an inch ruler, measure to see how long and how wide each sandwich is. Record the result on each picture.

(21)

Look at the pictures of the two containers below. Draw a cake under each picture that would appropriately fit inside each container. Then circle the container that has the most volume and could hold the biggest cake.

(22)

Draw two different sized containers of play dough. Circle the container that contains the most volume.

(23)

Look at the pictures of the two swimming pools below. Circle the swimming pool that is the longest.

(24)

Using the same pictures of the two swimming pools, draw an X on the swimming pool that contains the most volume.

(25)

Look around the room and pick an object to draw. Under your picture identify if you will measure the object’s length, width, or volume. Measure the object and record your results below the picture.

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