1st Grade - Explain Your Thinking

 
     
 
     
 
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1st
Problem Solving
Explain Your Thinking
Explain the reasoning used and justify the procedures selected
Your child will demonstrate a complete understanding of the math standards such that he/she will be able to explain how, when and why to use specific math procedures.
 

Sample Problems

(1)

Explain the different methods of measurement.

(2)

What does it mean to add?

(3)

What does it mean to subtract?

(4)

What is a fraction?

(5)

What kind of information can you get from a graph?

Learning Tips

(1)

In addition to regular computational homework, create simple addition and subtraction word problems for your child to solve. While solving the problems, ask your child to explain each step in the process and why it is necessary. These experiences will help your child internalize the math processes he/she is doing on a deeper level.

(2)

During your nightly reading time, choose books relate math concepts. Take the opportunity to point out any mathematical terms that are read, and ask your child to explain what they mean. For example, look for the words: take away, more, all together, how many left, least, fewest, greatest, most, etc.

(3)

Play school with your child, and allow him/her to teach you some basic math concepts. Set up a lesson plan ahead of time by telling your child that you do not really understand a certain concept like addition, subtraction, graphing, fractions, etc. Using a white board and markers, as your child to explain and demonstrate these skills. When it is your turn to do problems, make a few mistakes and ask for help. This will be an excellent opportunity for your child to show you the correct procedure and explain why it works that way.

(4)

Use trips to the grocery or hardware store as opportunities to reinforce math concepts. For example, in the produce aisle, ask your child for help in determining how much of each item is needed. This experience can reinforce addition, subtraction and measurement (weight) concepts. Take a ruler or tape measure to the hardware store and let your child measure items that you purchase. If possible, let your child predict how many or what items (pieces of wood, for example) you might need based on the measurements.

(5)

Let your child conduct a family census. Your child can take a survey on favorite activities, food, color, etc. and graph the results. It is important to go through this process with your child so that he/she can explain each step, and so that you can redirect him/her if mistakes are made.

Extra Help Problems

(1)

How would you divide a sandwich between 2 people?

(2)

How would you divide a pizza evenly between 4 people?

(3)

Make .50 cents using only dimes. How many do you need and why?

(4)

Make .25 cents using only nickels. How many do you need and why?

(5)

Make .75 using only 5 coins. What coins can you use?

(6)

Make .47 cents using only 5 coins. What coins can you use?

(7)

Make $1.00 using the fewest coins possible.

(8)

Make .68 cents using the fewest coins possible.

(9)

Make .89 cents using the fewest coins possible.

(10)

I am a two digit number whose digits add up to 9. The digit in my ones place is an odd number greater than 4. What number am I?

(11)

I am a two digit number whose digits add up to 3. The digit in my ones place is an odd number less than 4. What number am I?

(12)

I am a two digit number whose digits add up to 18. Both of my digits are odd numbers. What number am I?

(13)

I am a two digit number whose digits add up to 9. The digit in my ones place is an even number less than one. What number am I?

(14)

I am a two digit number whose digits add up to 8. Both of my digits even numbers less than 5. What number am I?

(15)

If Sam has $1.00 in change and gives .25 cents to Sally, do you add or subtract to find the new total, and why?

(16)

If Sally has .50 cents and earns another .25 cents, do you add or subtract to find the new total, and why?

(17)

If Sam has .30 cents and his dad gives him .25 cents more, do you add or subtract to find the new total, and why?

(18)

If Sally has .80 cents and her brother takes .20 cents away, do you add or subtract to find the new total, and why?

(19)

If Sam has .25 and his grandmas gives him .50 cents more, do you add or subtract to find the new total, and why?

(20)

What kind of graph is best for charting favorite foods and why?

(21)

What kind of graph is best for charting how many boys and how many girls are in your class and why?

(22)

What would be the best way to track how many teeth your classmates lost during the school year and why?

(23)

If you are adding one and two digit numbers, what math tools can you use to help you?

(24)

If you are subtracting one and two digit numbers, what math tools can you use to help you?

(25)

If you need to measure the length of a book, but don’t have a ruler, what else might you use to measure?

 

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