1st Grade - Reading Aloud

 
     
 
     
 
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1st
Reading and Comprehension
Reading aloud
Read aloud with fluency in a manner that sounds like natural speech.
The students will be able to read grade level appropriate (first grade reading material) clearly and accurately. They will demonstrate their fluency and their reading with sound like natural speech.
 

Sample Problems

(1)

Read the following sentence out loud.

I will make my bed in the morning.

(2)

Can you read the following short passage out loud?

I want to go fishing with my friend.

Learning Tips

(1)

One of the best ways to practice this skill is to have your child read aloud to you every night. When your child is reading help them to identify words that may be difficult for them. If the words they are struggling with follow a certain pattern (long vowels, r-controlled words, digraphs, etc.) it would be a good idea to practice those particular types of words. If they are struggling with their blending skills, continual practice of this skill would also be beneficial.

(2)

Turn Taking: Another fun way to practice reading fluency is to have your child read aloud and then you read aloud. This offers you an opportunity to listen and assess what may be difficult for your child and oral reading. It also gives your child an opportunity to hear appropriate modeling of oral reading.

(3)

Listening Game: For this activity, your child will need to use their listening skills. You will read two sentences aloud. One sentence you will read fluently and accurately and the other sentence will be read as if it is a “challenge” for you. Your child will need to listen to both sentences and pick which one sounds better and then explain why. You can also ask your child to “be the teacher” and explain how to figure out words you do not know and let them provide you with feedback for how to improve your fluency.

(4)

Recordings: Pick a grade level appropriate small story or passage to use for the week. You can use the link below to find sample text. http://www.tampareads.com/books-ol/index-ol.htm

On Monday, have your child read the story aloud into a tape recorder. After they have finished reading, have them listen to the recording and discuss anything that they noticed. Continue with the same story each night and saving each recording from every night. On Friday, have your child listen to Monday’s recording and compare it to Friday’s recording. Discuss the difference that they hear and acknowledge where they made improvements and how to continue to make improvements as they read new text.

(5)

Reading Wands: As a family, try to have at least one night a week where everyone in your house sits down to share a book. You will need to make a special “reading wand” for this activity. Sit all together and the person who has the reading wand will start reading the first page of the story. When they have completed reading the first page, they will pass the wand and the book to someone else and that person will take a turn. While the reading is taking place, encourage your child to listen to all of the different readers and strategies they may use if they are unsure of a word. When the story is complete, discuss as a family what happened in the story and what to do if you come across words you do not understand.

Extra Help Problems

(1)

Read the following story out loud to yourself. Practice any words that are difficult any then read the story to an adult.



(2)

Look at the ending punctuation on this sentence. Read the sentence with appropriate intonation.

  • I can’t wait!


(3)

Circle the face that shows the mood of the sentence.

(happy, scared, excited, sad)

  • That movie made me cry.

(4)

Read the following sentences out loud to your partner. Circle any words that are difficult. Reread the sentences to an adult. Have them help you with the difficult words.

  • The lady bug is on the leaf.

  • She has strong wings.

  • She likes to fly.

(5)

If you are reading a sentence when someone is excited, what kind of punctuation would you see at the end of the sentence. (!)

(6)

Pretend you read a question. What kind of punctuation will be at the end of the question? (?)

(7)

What do you do when you see a comma (,) in a sentence? (pause and take a breath)

(8)

What happens at the end of question when you read it out loud?
(your voice goes up)

(9)

Read the following 3 sentences to an adult. Pay attention to the punctuation at the end of each sentence.

  • She was mad.

  • Are you mad?

  • I am very mad!

(10)

Read the following sentence. Circle the face that describes how it should be read aloud.

  • The scary goblin came crashing through the door!


(11)

Circle the arrow of what your voice will do when you read this question. Will the sound of your voice go up or down at the end of the question?

  • Will you go shopping with me?

(12)

Read the following sentences to yourself. Next, read the same sentences out loud to an adult. Talk about any words that you need help with.

  • The girl went walking in the forest.

  • She saw a dark shadow behind a tree.

  • The little girl became scared.

  • She quickly ran home.

(13)

Read the following sentences to yourself. Next, read the same sentences out loud to an adult. Talk about any words that you need help with.

  • The brown dog is lazy.

  • He slept on the floor.

  • He did not get up.

  • He liked sleeping.

(14)

Circle the sentence below that is asking something.

  • The boy had new skates.

  • He liked to play ball.

  • What is your favorite sport?

(15)

I got a brand new bike! Do you think this sentence shows someone who is scared, excited, or mad? Circle the correct answer.

(16)

Which of the following statements would you read with a regular voice?

  • Do you want to eat half of my sandwich?

  • I can write my last name.

  • Where will you have your party?


(17)

Circle the sentence that asks you something.

  • Where is my pink dress?

  • I can’t come to your house.

  • I did it!

(18)

Underline the sentence that tells of someone being excited.

  • She saw a brown cat in the tree.

  • I can’t wait for my party to start!

  • What do you want to do?

(19)

Look at the faces on this page (happy, sad, scared). Circle the face that shows how the person in this sentence feels.


My dog Spot ran away today.

(20)

Read the following sentences to yourself. Next read the sentences to an adult. Discuss any difficult words you find.

  • I went to the beach with Sally.

  • The water was very cold.

  • The sand was hot on my toes.

  • I had a good time

  • Do you like going to the beach?

(21)

Read the following sentences to yourself. Next read the sentences to an adult. Discuss any difficult words you find.

  • My class went on a trip to the zoo.

  • I saw a huge lion.

  • He had a large, fluffy mane.

  • The lion also let out a scary roar.

  • I was scared!

(22)

Read the following sentences to yourself. Next read the sentences to an adult. Discuss any difficult words you find.

  • We went to the circus.

  • There were many people there.

  • I saw lions, tigers, and bears.

  • They also had clowns at the circus.

  • We had a great time!

  • Do you like the circus?

(23)

Circle the sentence that asks you something.

  • Pickles are green.

  • That cat is funny!

  • Where is your brother?

(24)

Circle the sentence that tells you something.

  • Where is her reading book?

  • Can you find my shoes?

  • The pink pig is in the mud.

(25)

Read the following sentences to yourself. Next read the sentences to an adult. Discuss any difficult words you find.

  • Our class went to the library today.

  • We listen to a story.

  • We also checked out a book to take home.

  • My class really enjoyed this!

  • What book did you get?

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