1st Grade - Word And Sentence Meaning

 
     
 
     
 
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1st
Words
Word and sentence meaning
Use context to resolve ambiguities about word and sentence meanings.
Your child will recognize that some words and sentences can be interpreted in multiple ways. Understanding this concept, your child will use contextual clues to determine true meaning of such words and/or sentences.
 

Sample Problems

(1)

What does this word or sentence mean to you?

(2)

Can you think of another meaning for this word or sentence?

(3)

How do you know the meaning you chose is correct?

(4)

Are there clues in the sentence(s) before and after that tell you the right meaning?

(5)

Are there any pictures that help you decide which meaning is correct?

Learning Tips

(1)

Choose any Amelia Bedelia book. Read with your child and track on a chart when and how many times Amelia misunderstood. At the end of the book, review the list and discuss with your child why Amelia got confused. Ask your child to explain what she could have done differently that would have helped her to better understand.

(2)

Play “Concentration” using word cards that are homophones

Using blank index cards, write homophone (words that sound the same, but are spelled differently and have different meanings) words in pairs, one on each card. For example: BARE and BEAR. Write at least 8 sets of words that can be matched by sound like the example above. Place the cards face down on a table, and ask your child to find the matches. When the game is complete, have a discussion with your child explaining that sometimes words and sentences can have more than one meaning, just like homophones.

(3)

Go Fish” for homophones. Applying the same concept as the game above, write at least 15 sets (you can use the cards above for this game) of homophone word pairs, one on each card and play Go Fish. When the game is complete, have a discussion with your child explaining that sometimes words and sentences can have more than one meaning, just like homophones.

(4)

Many ambiguities in English exist because of the complex network of idioms (an expression that has meaning which cannot be understood from the meaning of its component words). In order to teach your child about idioms. Play an idiom game where you speak an idiom, and your child draws a picture to illustrate the expression. For example, “Did a cat catch your tongue?” After your child draws the picture, explain what the expression really means and how idioms cannot be taken at face value.

(5)

Another reason ambiguities exist in English is the use of sarcasm. For younger readers, the use of sarcasm can create a great deal of ambiguity, which leads to poor reading comprehension. Read Junie B. Jones, First Grader At Last, with your child. At the beginning of the book, each time you read a passage that contains sarcasm, stop and discuss it with your child. As you progress through the pages, let your child note the points of sarcasm. Discuss its uses in the English language.

Extra Help Problems

(1)

Write the definition of a homophone

(2)

Write four pairs of homophones

(3)

Choose the correct answer for the following sentence: The _______ climbed in the tree. A)bare B)bar C) bear

(4)

Choose the correct answer for the following sentence: ________ are you going? A)wear B) where C) we’re

(5)

Choose the correct answer for the following sentence: She asked if I ________ like to go to the store. A) would B) wood C) wuld

(6)

Choose the correct answer for the following sentence: In order to take the train, we had to pay the ________. A) fear B) fare C) fair

(7)

Write two homophones that start with the letter “B”.

(8)

Write two homophones that start with the letter “R”.

(9)

What is wrong with this sentence: “Are you coming.” How does the punctuation confuse the reader?

(10)

Is there something wrong with this sentence: “The sky is blue?” How does the punctuation change meaning?

(11)

What is the difference between these two sentences: “I am going.” and “I am going?”

(12)

How does punctuation at the end of a sentence helps the reader understand the meaning of what is read?

(13)

What is the purpose of a comma?

(14)

Write three homophones that start with “Th”.

(15)

Write two homophones that start with “Wh”.

(16)

Name two strategies you can use when you read a word or sentence in a story that you don’t understand.

(17)

If you are reading a picture book and don’t understand why something has happened, what should you do?

(18)

Describe how pictures help you read.

(19)

Which is easier: reading a story without pictures, or creating a story in your mind from pictures you see in a book? Why?

(20)

Write a paragraph talking about your favorite type of book (i.e. picture books, information books, chapter books, etc.) and why.

(21)

Read for twenty minutes.

(22)

Write the definition of an idiom.

(23)

Draw a picture of an idiom you know or have heard before.

(24)

Write the definition of sarcasm.

(25)

Explain how sarcasm can be used in books to make the story more interesting.

 

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