5th Grade - 5th Grade Reading Aloud

 
     
 
     
 
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5th
Reading and Comprehension
5th grade reading aloud
Read aloud narrative and expository text fluently and accurately and with appropriate pacing, intonation, and expression.
The ability to read aloud quickly, correctly, and with understanding is called fluency. Fluency paves the way for reading comprehension because fluent readers spend less energy on word attack and concentrate more on the meaning of the text.
 

Sample Problems

(1)

What clues in the text tell you when to pause? (punctuation)

(2)

True or false: You should pause after each word you read aloud. (false)

(3)

True or false: You should always read at the same speed, no matter what kind of reading material it is. (false)

(4)

True or false: Reading too slowly interrupts the flow of ideas and prevents you from understanding what you are reading. (true)

(5)

True or false: You should always be serious when you read aloud. (false)

Learning Tips

(1)

Vocabulary

Fluency – the ability to read a text accurately, quickly, and with comprehension.

Narrative texts– stories, such as novels.

Expository texts- informative materials, such as textbooks or newspapers.

Pacing- how quickly or slowly one speaks. The speaker shouldn’t rush and pause only to take a breath; nor should the speaker speak so slowly that the audience feels awkward or grows bored.

Expression- adding emotion and interest to what you are reading.

Intonation- the rise and fall in pitch of the voice when speaking.

(2)

The Importance of Fluency

As readers head into upper elementary grades, fluency becomes increasingly important. The volume of reading required in the upper elementary years escalates dramatically. Students whose reading is slow or labored will have trouble meeting the reading demands of subjects such as fifth grade history, science, and even math.

Fluency provides an essential bridge between word recognition and comprehension. Because fluent readers do not have to concentrate on decoding the words, they can focus their attention on what the text means. They can make connections among the ideas in the text and between the text and their background knowledge.

In other words, fluent readers recognize words and comprehend at the same time. Less fluent readers, however, must focus their attention on figuring out the words, leaving them little attention for understanding the text.

(3)

Repeated Reading

You may need to read and hear a passage of text three to eight times to really get the flow of it down. Try this method and see how your reading improves.

1. Have a parent or teacher read aloud to you. (Books on tape work too.) Track the words in the book with your finger as you are listening.

2. Match your voice to theirs and read it together.

3. Finally, you read it out loud by yourself.

Read aloud for 30 minutes each day for at least 6 weeks.

(4)

Smooshing

In oral speech there are no breaks between words. Try listening to someone speak in a foreign language to really hear this; ask a bilingual friend to speak to you at a normal pace in another language or borrow a foreign language tape from the library.


Non-fluent readers break between each word and interrupt the flow of ideas too much. Try it yourself: first read a paragraph and pause after each word. Then read the same paragraph and really “smoosh” the words together, pausing only for punctuation. Which sounded better to your ear? (the smooshed version)


(5)

Your Favorite Poem

Memorize your favorite poem. Practice it over and over again until you have it completely down. Then try saying it with a certain emotion, such as sadness or excitement, to emphasize expression and intonation. Say it for your parents or friends and see which version they like best.

Extra Help Problems

(1)

Practice saying this line until you can say it quickly, correctly, and with expression. Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers. How many pickled peppers did Peter Piper pick?


(2)

Practice saying this rhyme until you can say it quickly, correctly, and with expression.

Hickory, dickory, dock,

The mouse ran up the clock;

The clock struck one,

The mouse ran down;

Hickory, dickory, dock.


(3)

Practice saying this riddle until you can say it correctly, quickly, and with expression.

As I was going to St. Ives,

I met a man with seven wives;

Every wife had seven sacks,

Every sack had seven cats,

Every cat had seven kits;

Kits, cats, sacks, and wives,

How many were going to St. Ives?


Then you can see if you family and friends know the answer (one-- only the man).

(4)

Practice saying this line until you can say it quickly, correctly, and with expression. How much wood can a woodchuck chuck if a woodchuck could chuck wood?


(5)

Practice saying this line until you can say it quickly, correctly, and with expression. A woodchuck would chuck all the wood he could chuck if a woodchuck could chuck wood.

(6)

Practice saying this until you can say it quickly, correctly, and with expression. Fuzzy Wuzzy was a bear. Fuzzy Wuzzy had no hair. Fuzzy Wuzzy wasn’t fuzzy, was he?

(7)

Practice saying this rhyme until you can say it quickly, correctly, and with expression.

Little Miss Muffet

Sat on a tuffet,

Eating her curds and whey;

Along came a spider,

And sat down beside her,

And frightened Miss Muffet away.

(8)

Practice saying this rhyme until you can say it quickly, correctly, and with expression.

There was a crooked man, and he went a crooked mile,

And found a crooked sixpence against a crooked stile,

He bought a crooked cat, which caught a crooked mouse,

And they all lived together in a little crooked house.

(9)

Practice saying this rhyme until you can say it quickly, correctly, and with expression.

Thirty days hath September,

April, June, and November;

February has twenty-eight alone,

All the rest have thirty-one,

Excepting leap year, that's the time

When February's days are twenty-nine.

(10)

Practice saying this rhyme until you can say it quickly, correctly, and with expression.

Fiddle-dee-dee, fiddle-dee-dee,

The fly has married the bumblebee.

Said the fly, said he,

"Will you marry me,

and live with me sweet bumble bee?"

Fiddle dee dee, fiddle dee dee,

The fly has married the bumblebee.

(11)

Practice saying this rhyme until you can say it quickly, correctly, and with expression.

Little Boy Blue, come blow your horn,

The sheep's in the meadow, the cow's in the corn.

Where is the boy who looks after the sheep?

He's under the haystack, fast asleep.

(12)

Practice saying this rhyme until you can say it quickly, correctly, and with expression.

Peter, Peter, pumpkin eater,

Had a wife and couldn't keep her;

He put her in a pumpkin shell,

And there he kept her very well.

(13)

Practice saying this rhyme until you can say it quickly, correctly, and with expression.

Rub-a-dub-dub, three men in a tub,

And who do you think they be?

The butcher, the baker, the candlestick maker,

Turn them out, knaves all three.

(14)

Practice saying this rhyme until you can say it quickly, correctly, and with expression.

Star light, star bright,

First star I see tonight,

I wish I may, I wish I might,

Have the wish I wish tonight.

(15)

Practice saying this rhyme until you can say it quickly, correctly, and with expression.

Little Jack Horner,

Sat in a corner,

Eating a Christmas pie.

He stuck in his thumb,

And pulled out a plum,

And said, "What a good boy am I."

(16)

Practice saying this rhyme until you can say it quickly, correctly, and with expression.

Hickety, pickety, my black hen,

She lays eggs for gentlemen.

Gentlemen come every day,

To see what my black hen doth lay.

(17)

Practice saying this rhyme until you can say it quickly, correctly, and with expression.

Up, little baby, stand up clear;

Mother will hold you, do not fear;

Dimple and smile, and chuckle and crow!

There, little baby, now you know!

(18)

Practice saying this rhyme until you can say it quickly, correctly, and with expression.

There was an old woman

Lived under a hill;

And if she's not gone,

She lives there still.

(19)

Practice saying this rhyme until you can say it quickly, correctly, and with expression.

There was a man in our town,

And he was wondrous wise;

He jumped into a brier bush,

And scratched out both his eyes;

And when he saw his eyes were out,

With all his might and main

He jumped into another bush,

And scratched 'em in again.

(20)

Practice saying this rhyme until you can say it quickly, correctly, and with expression.

There was an old woman tossed up in a basket

Nineteen times as high as the moon;

Where she was going I couldn't but ask it,

For in her hand she carried a broom.

"Old woman, old woman, old woman," quoth I,

"O whither, O whither, O whither, so high?"

"To brush the cobwebs off the sky!"

"Shall I go with thee?" "Aye, by and by."

(21)

Practice saying this rhyme until you can say it quickly, correctly, and with expression.

Monday's child is fair of face,

Tuesday's child is full of grace;

Wednesday's child is full of woe,

Thursday's child has far to go;

Friday's child is loving and giving,

Saturday's child works hard for its living;

But the child that is born on the Sabbath day

Is bonny and good as they say.

(22)

Practice saying this riddle until you can say it quickly, correctly, and with expression.

I have a little sister, they call her Peep, Peep;

She wades the waters deep, deep, deep;

She climbs the mountains high, high, high;

Poor little creature, she has but one eye.

(Answer: a star)


(23)

Practice saying this rhyme until you can say it quickly, correctly, and with expression.

I had a little nut-tree, nothing would it bear

But a silver nutmeg and a golden pear;

The king of Spain’s daughter came to visit me,

And all for the sake of my little nut tree.

I skipped over water, I danced over sea,

And all the birds in the air couldn’t catch me.

(24)

Why is it important to be able to read aloud quickly? (so your brain is not interrupted or slowed down too much to understand what you are reading)

(25)

Should you expect to read a paragraph perfectly the first time you see it? (No, you may need to practice many times to get it down right)

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