5th Grade - Deliver Informative Presentations

 
     
 
     
 
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5th
Oral Presentations
Deliver informative presentations
Deliver informative presentations about an important idea, issue, or event by the following means: Frame questions to direct the investigation. Establish a controlling idea or topic. Develop the topic with simple facts, details, examples, and explanatio
Be able to write and give an informative presentation that is focused around a thesis and supported with facts, details, examples, and explanations.
 

Sample Problems

(1)

Is the main purpose of an informative presentation to entertain, persuade, or inform? (inform)

(2)

What is another name of your main idea? (thesis)

(3)

What types of support should you include in your presentation? (facts, details, examples, and explanations)

(4)

Once you have your topic, what should you come up with to guide your investigation? (questions about your topic)

(5)

Which is NOT a good topic for an informative presentation: an idea, issue, event, or story? (story)

Learning Tips

(1)

The Process of Crafting an Informative Presentation

1. Choose the idea, issue, or event that will be your topic. Pick a topic that interests you-- after all, you’ll be spending a great deal of time thinking about it. The topic shouldn’t be so broad that you can’t fit all the important information about it into your presentation, but it also should not be so narrow that you don’t have enough to fill the speaking time.

2. Ask questions about your topic. What do you want to know about it? What will your audience want to know about it? Write down these guiding questions that you need to answer.

3. Now collect your information. Do research on your topic to fill in any gaps in your knowledge of it. Make sure you can answer all of your guiding questions. Did any other important questions come up? Answer those as well.

4. Organize your information by first listing it all out. Then put it into a logical order using an outline. Decide which ideas should go together. What is your thesis?

5. Write a strong introduction that grabs your audience’s attention and states your thesis. Then write the body of your speech, which includes your main supporting ideas and the evidence for them (facts, details, examples, and explanations). Finish with a strong conclusion.

6. Once your informative presentation is written, practice it many times. You should be very comfortable with it. Ask your parents and friends to listen to it and give you feedback. What did they find confusing? How was your presentation? Take their comments into account and rehearse several more times. By the time you present to your teacher and class, you should feel very confident that you will present the best speech you can.


(2)

What is An Informative Presentation?


The purpose of an informative presentation is to inform your audience about a topic. Research reports, directions on how to do something, biographies, and book reports can all be considered informative presentations. Usually you will need to do research on your topic before you can give an informative presentation. An informative presentation is not a narrative presentation or a persuasive presentation, so you do not need to tell a story or try to persuade your audience to agree with you.


(3)

Informal Practice


For informal practice giving and listening to informative presentations, gather a group of your family or friends. Imagine that you have been abducted by aliens who want to know about things on planet Earth. Pick something you would like to explain to your captors. It can be something serious or something silly. For example, how a toilet works, what “fairness” is, or what it means to have a birthday party. Give everyone only half an hour to practice. Then deliver your speech to your family or friends and have them give theirs. What did you notice about theirs? How could yours have been better? Keep these points in mind when you approach your school assignment. And remember that presentations can be fun!



(4)

Speaking Tips

When you present your informative presentation, make sure you are following the guidelines of how to deliver any good speech:

1. Be prepared. You can give the best speech when you have organized your material well and practiced it many times.

2. Use your voice wisely. Speak loudly and clearly. Try to use interesting variety like pausing or speaking softer at times. If you want, you can speak in different ways when you are saying lines from different character

3. Remember to make eye contact and body movements. Maintain eye contact with audience and use natural gestures that add to your presentation.

4. Use visual aids. If your teacher allows it, create simple, clear visual aids, such as a poster, that adds and reinforces to your message.

(5)

Vocabulary


Thesis- a statement of the main idea of your presentation.


Informative presentation- a speech that gives information about a topic.


Extra Help Problems

(1)

True or False: When you deliver an informative presentation, you should look only at your teacher. (false)

(2)

True or False: When you deliver an informative presentation, you should try to persuade your audience to change their mind about your topic. (false)

(3)

True or False: When you deliver an informative presentation, you should stand very still. (fasle)

(4)

True or False: When you deliver an informative presentation, you should keep your eyes looking down at your notes. (false)

(5)

True or False: When you deliver an informative presentation, you should have a thesis statement. (true)

(6)

True or False: When you deliver an informative presentation, you should have strong supporting details. (true)

(7)

True or False: When you deliver an informative presentation, you should only include details that are closely connected to your topic and thesis. (true)

(8)

True or False: When you deliver an informative presentation, you should have an introduction that gets the listeners’ attention and states your thesis. (true)

(9)

True or False: When you deliver an informative presentation, you should end with a strong conclusion. (true)

(10)

True or False: Your audience should remember information from your informative presentation. (true)

(11)

True or False: Your audience should remember the conclusion to your informative presentation. (true)

(12)

True or False: Your audience should leave your informative presentation knowing more about your topic than they did before. (true)

(13)

True or False: You should become an expert on your topic before you give an informative speech about it. (true)

(14)

True or False: Your informative presentation should be broken into three parts: an introduction, body, and conclusion. (true)

(15)

True or False: You do not need to practice your informative presentation before you give it. (false)

(16)

True or False: You should be interested in the topic you choose for your informative presentation. (true)

(17)

True or False: You should come up with a list of questions to guide your investigation into the topic for your informative presentation. (true)

(18)

True or False: You should write your informative presentation just based on what you already know. (false)

(19)

True or False: You do not need to write drafts of your informative presentation. (false)

(20)

True or False: You should tell a story when you deliver your informative presentation. (false)

(21)

True or False: You should include all of the information that you discovered while researching your topic. (false)

(22)

True or False: You should use visual aids to reinforce your main ideas if you teacher permits them. (true)

(23)

Who would NOT be a good audience to give you helpful feedback after you rehearse your informative presentation: your parents, your friends, or your stuffed animals? (your stuffed animals)

(24)

How many times should you practice giving your informative presentation? (as many times as you need to become confident that you are giving the best presentation that you can)

(25)

Which of the following is not an informative presentation: a book report, a commercial, and a report on a biography. (commercial)

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