5th Grade - Deliver Oral Presentations

 
     
 
     
 
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5th
Oral Presentations
Deliver oral presentations
Deliver narrative presentations: Establish a situation, plot, point of view, and setting with descriptive words and phrases. Show, rather than tell, the listener what happens.
Be able to tell a clear and meaningful story in an engaging way that combines a logical sequence of events with descriptive details.
 

Sample Problems

(1)

If you are using I, me, and my to give your narrative presentation, which point of view are you using, first or third person? (first person)

(2)

Do newscasters tell stories from first person or third person point of view? (third person)

(3)

True or False: A narrative presentation does not have to follow the guidelines for giving a good speech. (false)

(4)

True or False: A narrative presentation should not go into too much detail. (false)

(5)

What is a tool to help you organize your ideas before your write your narrative presentation? (an outline)

Learning Tips

(1)

Telling A Story


When you give a narrative presentation, you tell a clear and meaningful story in an engaging way. Events or experiences that you might make into a narrative presentation include playing on a sports team or winning a tournament, a vacation, a family celebration, a disappointment, an emergency, or a challenge you had to face. Sometimes you might choose an event from a literary text to turn into a narrative presentation instead of your own personal experience.

When you deliver a narrative presentation, you need to do use all of the skills that make a great speech, such as making eye contact, making natural gestures, and so on. You also need to give your listeners concrete sensory details that can help them feel as though they are experiencing your story instead of just hearing about it. You should try to make your story as meaningful and interesting as possible. For example, if you say, “I went to school today, and then I came home afterward” that isn’t much of a story. But if you say, “This morning, my mother almost got into an accident! We were driving along our street in the rain, and…” then your listeners want to hear more because you have created a setting and a plot.


(2)

Essential Elements


Make sure your narrative includes these essential elements:


Your setting should include when and where your story took place.


Plot means that you need to have something go wrong in your story so listeners want to hear how the problem is solved.


Point of view tells your listeners whom the experience happened to. A narrative presentation may be autobiographical (or a story that happened to you), in which case you use first person by saying “I”, “me”, and “my”. This is usually the kind of narratives you will write about and present in class. A narrative presentation may be given in third person, using “she”, “he”, or “they”. This is the kind of stories that you will see on the news.


(3)

Narratives In the News


Watch at least three national or local news stories. What are the elements each story included? What would help you understand the story better? What relevant information did the person include? What relevant information was left out? Did you feel like you were there? What could have made the story better? Keep these points in mind when you practice your own narrative presentation.

(4)

How to Come Up with Descriptive Details


Find a picture of something that has meaning to you. Maybe a trophy that you won or your old team uniform. How can you describe it so that your listeners can see it themselves? How does it smell, feel, or sound? Those are good descriptive details that will help you audience experience your narrative for themselves.


(5)

The Process of Making a Narrative Presentation

1. Choose an experience or story that you want to tell. Make sure it is meaningful.

2. Brainstorm about that experience, including ideas about the setting, the sequence of events, and descriptive details.

3. Create an outline to put your story elements into a logical order. Usually this order will be chronological, or arranged according to time.

4. Write the narrative presentation. Be sure to include all the elements necessary, from a strong opening to a interesting middle to a satisfying and complete ending.

5. Practice your presentation at least five times. Try to practice in front of an audience, such as your family or friends, who can give you feedback on your presentation skills.

6. Now you are ready to present to your teacher and class!

Extra Help Problems

(1)

True or False: A good personal narrative is based on an experience that has meaning to you. (true)

(2)

Is an autobiographical presentation about your own life or someone else’s life? (your own life)

(3)

True or False: The purpose of a narrative presentation is to inform the audience. (false)

(4)

True or False: A narrative presentation does not have a plot. (false)

(5)

True or False: If you are using she, he, or them in your narrative presentation, which perspective are you using, first or third person? (third person)

(6)

Which is a stronger topic for a narrative presentation, a story about a treasured memory of a day you spent with your grandmother or a story about how you cleaned your room? (a treasured memory of your grandmother)

(7)

True or False: The purpose of a narrative presentation is to inform the audience. (false)

(8)

True or False: A narrative presentation does not have a plot. (false)

(9)

True or False: A personal narrative is based on something that happened to you. (true)

(10)

True or False: You should only mention details that help the listeners visualize things in your story. (false- don’t forget the other senses!)

(11)

True or False: You should include concrete sensory details in your narrative presentation. (true)

(12)

True or False: You should include well-chosen details about characters in your narrative presentation. (true)

(13)

True or False: You should include well-chosen details about the setting in your narrative presentation. (true)

(14)

True or False: You should include verbs that are active and vivid in your narrative presentation. (true)

(15)

True or False: You should include insight into why the story is meaningful in your narrative presentation. (true)

(16)

True or False: You should practice your narrative presentation as many times as it takes for you to feel comfortable. (true)

(17)

You should create an outline for what purpose? (to organize your ideas)

(18)

Should you brainstorm before or after you create your outline? (before)

(19)

True or False: A narrative presentation is usually given in chronological order. (true)

(20)

True or False: A narrative presentation’s plot should include a problem and a solution to that problem. (true)

(21)

True or False: When giving a narrative presentation, you should switch between first and third person point of view. (false)

(22)

True or False: When giving a narrative presentation, you should tell your story in whatever order you feel like. (false)

(23)

True or False: When giving a narrative presentation, you should not include other characters. (false)

(24)

True or False: When giving a narrative presentation, you should try to summarize the events instead of giving specific details. (false)

(25)

Which of the following elements should NOT be included in a narrative presentation: a plot, a setting, characters, descriptive details, persuasive techniques, a unified point of view. (persuasive techniques)

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