5th Grade - Imagery, Metaphors And Symbolism

 
     
 
     
 
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5th
Stories and Literature
Imagery, metaphors and symbolism
Describe the function and effect of common literary devices (e.g., imagery, metaphor, symbolism).
Be able to identify common literary devices and say how they convey an author’s meaning.
 

Sample Problems

(1)

What is imagery? (when an author uses words that creates pictures in the reader’s mind by appealing to the senses)

(2)

What is a literary device? (techniques authors use to create meaning out of words)

(3)

What is symbolism? (when a specific object represents an idea)

(4)

What is the function of literary devices? (to effectively create a mood, setting, or attitude)

(5)

Which literary device is used in “the cricket chirped hello”? (personification)

Learning Tips

(1)

Vocabulary

Literary devices- techniques authors use to create meaning through language, which include sound techniques (such as alliteration or onamatopoeia) and figurative language (such as personification, imagery, symbolism, simile, or metaphor).


Imagery- creating pictures in the reader’s mind using words that describe the senses, usually with similes or metaphors.


Symbolism- The use of specific objects to represent abstract ideas.


Simile – a comparison using the words “like” or “as”. For example, “he was as quiet as a mouse” or “her eyes sparkled like diamonds”.


Metaphor – a comparison that does not use the words “like” or “as”. For example, “He’s a tiger when it comes to mowing the lawn!”


Hyperbole - a figure of speech which is an exaggeration. For example, “I tried a million times to get that open!”


Personification - giving human qualities, feelings, action, or characteristics to non-livings things such as objects or elements in nature. For example, “The trees whispered threats that the storm may be coming this way.” While you can definitely hear the wind in the trees, trees do not “whisper”; only human beings can.


Alliteration - the repetition of initial consonant sounds in neighboring words. For example, “The sweet sound of songbirds signaled spring’s arrival.”


Onomatopoeia- the use of words whose sounds make you think of their meanings. Examples include buzz, thump, or pop.


(2)

Guess the Object


Gather at least four objects to use in this activity. You want one for each sense, except for sight. Here are some examples:

  • Taste: fresh basil, garlic, licorice

  • Smell: onion, cinnamon, shoe, perfume

  • Touch: sandpaper, ice cube

  • Sound: beans in a can, bells


Tell your friends or parents that you are doing an imagery activity and need helpers: one describer and at least one guesser. The describer won’t be hurt in any way, but will be blindfolded. Once he has agreed, sit him down, cover his eyes, and ask him to describe your objects. The guesser shouldn’t be able to see the objects, and should try to figure out which the objects are. How good was the guesser? Write down the words and phrases the describer says to identify each object without seeing them. Could those words be used in a poem or story?


(3)

Draw the Images

Choose a poem or short story to read. As you go, notice words and phrases that create a mental picture by appealing to your senses. Fill in the first two columns as you read. Finish the chart after you have finished reading. Which phrases did you especially like?

Page # or line #

Word or Phrase

Sense (taste, touch, smell, sound, vision)

Your Drawing of It















(4)

Why Use Literary Devices?


Literary devices are one of the most effective ways an author can create a mood, attitude, setting, and vivid characters. The devices bring the reading to life in the reader’s mind. Think about how you can use words to bring an emotion to life.


Using a literary device, write down just one sentence that describes a certain emotion on a piece of paper and have a friend do the same. Trade and see if you can guess the emotion the other person intended from so few words.



(5)

Symbols


Authors use symbols to represent larger ideas. You are probably familiar with more symbols than you think. Think of all the folktales in which gold is the reward or the object of greed. What do you think about when you read someone has the key to something? What does a lamp or light symbolize? What is the symbol of our country? Can you think of any besides the Statue of Liberty or the bald eagle?


Extra Help Problems

(1)

The beating rain sounded like a baby beating on a pot” is an example of this type of literary device. (simile)

(2)

The wind whispered through the open window and up her neck” is an example of this type of literary device. (personification)

(3)

I heard Dad pacing in the cage he had built around himself” is an example of which type of literary device? (metaphor)

(4)

What is the main literary device William Blake used in these lines from his famous poem, “The Tyger”:

When the stars threw down their spears

And watered heaven with their tears


a) simile

b) metaphor

c) personification

d) alliteration

(c)

(5)

What is the main literary device used here: "The hot chocolate burned my tongue like a flame.”


a) onomatopoeia

b) simile

c) personification

d) alliteration

(b)

(6)

Which is an example of onomatopoeia?

a) run

b) hide

c) turn

d) thump

(d)

(7)

Which is an example of onomatopoeia?

a) go

b) now

c) walk

d) pop

(d)

(8)

Which is an example of a hyperbole?

a) whispering trees

b) she is as big as a house

c) love is a rose

d) like sparkling stars

(b)

(9)

Which is an example of a metaphor?

a) Life is like a jar of cookies

b) Life is a dream

c) Life is like a box of chocolates

d) Deirdre shook the sugar

(b)

(10)

Which is an example of a simile?

a) Deirdre shook the sugar

b) Life is a dream

c) Life is like a jar of cookies

d) Whispering willows

(c)

(11)

Which is an example of alliteration?

a) Deirdre shook the sugar

b) Life is a dream

c) Life is like a jar of cookies

d) Whispering willows

(d)

(12)

Which is an example of personification?

a) Deirdre shook the sugar

b) Life is a dream

c) Life is like a jar of cookies

d) Whispering willows

(d)

(13)

Which literary device is a repetition of the first letter or sound of words? (alliteration)

(14)

Which literary device is an exaggeration? (hyperbole)

(15)

Which literary device makes a comparison using like or as? (simile)

(16)

Which literary device compares two things without using like or as? (metaphor)

(17)

Which literary device is the use of concrete images and sensory details to create a picture in the reader’s mind? (imagery)

(18)

Which literary device is the use of words whose sound makes you think of their meaning? (onomatopoeia)

(19)

Which is an example of personification?

a) The motorcycle’s engine sprang to life.

b) Lucy lounged lazily.

c) The bee buzzed in my ear.

d) His eye was a camera.

(a)

(20)

Which is an example of alliteration?

a) The motorcycle’s engine sprang to life.

b) Lucy lounged lazily.

c) The bee buzzed in my ear.

d) His eye was a camera.

(b)

(21)

Which is an example of metaphor?

a) The motorcycle’s engine sprang to life.

b) Lucy lounged lazily.

c) The bee buzzed in my ear.

d) His eye was a camera.

(d)

(22)

Which is an example of onomatopoeia?

a) The motorcycle’s engine sprang to life.

b) Lucy lounged lazily.

c) The bee buzzed in my ear.

d) His eye was a camera.

(c)

(23)

Which is an example of personification?

a) Barry bought beautiful bunches of flowers.

b) The door thumped closed.

c) The hare flipped his ear coyly in my direction.

d) Her mind was sharper than a piece of glass.

(c)

(24)

Which is an example of alliteration?

a) Barry bought beautiful bunches of flowers.

b) The door thumped closed.

c) The hare flipped his ear coyly in my direction.

d) Her mind was sharper than a piece of glass.

(a)

(25)

Which is an example of onomatopoeia?

a) Barry bought beautiful bunches of flowers.

b) The door thumped closed.

c) The hare flipped his ear coyly in my direction.

d) Her mind was sharper than a piece of glass.

(b)

(26)

Which is an example of metaphor?

a) Barry bought beautiful bunches of flowers.

b) The door thumped closed.

c) The hare flipped his ear coyly in my direction.

d) Her mind was sharper than a piece of glass.

(d)

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