5th Grade - Asking Follow-up Questions

 
     
 
     
 
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5th
Speaking and Listening
Asking follow-up questions
Ask questions that seek information not already discussed.
Be able to think of questions that are related to the concept at hand, but may go beyond it.
 

Sample Problems

(1)

What are two purposes for asking questions? (1. Ask questions to clarify what you have heard. 2. Ask questions that relate to the topic but have not been mentioned yet.)

(2)

Which type of questions do you find on the show Jeopardy? (factual questions)

(3)

True or False: There is only one way to listen. (false; there is active listening and passive listening)

(4)

True or False: You ask the same types of questions when you listen to your friend and when you listen to your teacher. (false)

(5)

True or False: Factual questions have a right or wrong answer. (true)

Learning Tips

(1)

Vocabulary


Listening- the process of hearing, receiving, constructing meaning from, and responding to spoken and nonverbal messages.


Active listening- is intentionally focusing on what you are hearing to get the most out of it.


Factual questions ask for facts or other straight-forward answers that are either right or wrong.


Conceptual questions ask for creative answers based on a topic, but not limited to it.


(2)

Good Listening at Home and Good Listening at School


Think about an adult or friend who you like to talk to. How does he or she listen to you when you are talking about something that you are happy or upset about? He or she probably asks questions that show interest, concern, or understanding about what you have said.


Being a good listener with friends can be different than being a good listener at school in some ways. For students, school listening means that their bodies are still, they are sitting up, they are looking at the speaker, and they are focusing on what is being said.


When do you give feedback when listening in school? When is this appropriate? How is it different to give feedback in a conversation with a friend, classroom discussion, or a small group? When do you ask questions in school? Which kinds of questions are appropriate in school?


(3)

Purpose of Questions


You use different listening skills depending on your purpose for listening. Think about the difference between listening to a teacher give instructions and listening when you are at a piano recital.


Effective listeners are able to listen actively, restate, interpret, respond to, and evaluate increasingly complex messages. What you say can contribute to the content and quality of your listening experiences.


When you don’t understand something, you should ask a clarifying question.


Another category of questions includes questions that ask about something related to the topic but not yet mentioned yet. These questions are often called conceptual questions, and they relate to the topic but have not been mentioned yet or go beyond the facts that have been said.


(4)

Practice Your Skill of Listening

Listening is a skill that you can practice and improve, just like you can practice the skill of hitting a tennis ball. Ask questions often as you read and listen. When someone is reading aloud to you, predict what will happen next or how the characters feel, or what you would do if you were the character. This is called active listening. Practice actively listening at least three times a day for a week. How did it go? What did you learn? Did you hear anything that you might have missed ordinarily?


(5)

Listening Situations

You have to be a good active listener so you can think of good questions. Factual questions ask for facts or other straight forward answers that are either right or wrong. Conceptual questions ask for creative answers based on a topic, but not limited to it.


Here are some situations that you need to comprehend what you hear. Think of questions you might ask in each situation, both factual questions and more involved conceptual questions:

  • Listen to make predictions about stories read aloud.

  • Listen so you can follow oral directions.

  • Listen critically to identify main ideas and supporting details.

  • Listen to someone giving an interview.

  • Listen to form an opinion on a subject based on information, ideas, and themes

  • Listen to identify essential details for note taking

Extra Help Problems

(1)

What are some things a good listener does? (Makes eye contact, is quiet, does not interrupt, does not move around, does not do

something else at same time, asks relevant questions, etc.)

(2)

True or False: good listening means more than just being quiet and waiting for the other person to finish talking; a good listener makes comments and asks questions. (true)

(3)

True or False: Active listening involves not only listening to what is being said, but also trying to extract as much information as possible from it. (true)

(4)

True or False: Hearing ideas expressed in standard ways helps you learn to recognize the correct form in which you will receive information. (true)

(5)

True or False: You need to listen so you can follow oral directions. (true)

(6)

True or False: You need to listen so you can make predictions about stories read aloud. (true)

(7)

True or False: You need to listen so you can identify main ideas and supporting details. (true)

(8)

True or False: You need to listen to someone giving an interview if you want to pick out the essential information. (true)

(9)

True or False: Conceptual questions always have a right or wrong answer. (false)

(10)

True or False: You listen to a concert and to your science teacher’s lectures in the same way. (false)

(11)

True or False: A question can always be answered by a single word or phrase. (false)

(12)

True or False: You can only ask a speaker about the facts he or she mentioned in the speech. (false)

(13)

True or False: Your prior knowledge can help you think of things related to the topic that a speaker might have left out. (true)

(14)

Which type of question usually does not have a single answer that is considered right? (conceptual)

(15)

If you are thinking of a question that gets at a specific fact, which type of question is this? (factual)

(16)

You are listening to a presentation from one of your classmates. Is it appropriate to talk to your neighbor? (no)

(17)

You are listening to the radio in the car when you are going to soccer practice. Must you be actively listening? (no)

(18)

You are trying to take notes in history class. Must you be actively listening? (yes)

(19)

You are listening your sister practice violin. Must you be actively listening? (no)

(20)

You are listening your friend give a report in class. Must you be actively listening? (yes)

(21)

You are listening to your dad analyze the football game. Must you be actively listening? (no)

(22)

You are listening to your teacher give directions on how to do your classwork. Must you be actively listening? (yes)

(23)

You are listening to your teacher have a one-on-one conference with another student. Must you be actively listening? (no)

(24)

You are listening to a guest speaker. Must you be actively listening? (yes)

(25)

You are listening to a guest speaker. Should you think about which questions you want to ask questions at the end of the speech? (yes)

 

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