5th Grade - Interpreting Messages And Perspectives

 
     
 
     
 
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5th
Speaking and Listening
Interpreting messages and perspectives
Interpret a speaker's verbal and nonverbal messages, purposes, and perspectives.
Be able to look for and understand what a speaker’s purpose and meaning is from her words and nonverbal communication.
 

Sample Problems

(1)

What is nonverbal communication? (ways besides spoken words that convey meaning, such as facial expressions, gestures, posture, volume, pace, use of silence, and tone of voice)

(2)

Are the phrases that speakers repeat not important, somewhat important, or very important? (very important)

(3)

True or False: The overall message of a speech comes as much from nonverbal communication as it does from the words a speaker says. (true)

(4)

True or False: The speaker who pauses is messing up since there should never be any silence in a speech. (false)

(5)

True or False: If the emotions the speaker displays do not match the message, then the audience will not trust the speaker or believe her message. (true)

Learning Tips

(1)

Vocabulary


Nonverbal communication– ways besides spoken words that convey meaning, such as facial expressions, gestures, posture, volume, pace, use of silence (pauses), and tone of voice


Pace- the speed at which someone speaks


(2)

The Speaker’s Purpose


Knowing the speaker’s purpose is important for you to understand what the speaker is trying to say and what the speaker wants you and the rest of the audience to do.


As you listen to a speech, ask yourself these questions:


  • What is the speaker’s goal? Is it to educate, to motivate, to persuade, or to entertain?

  • What is the main message the speaker wants you to agree with and understand?

  • Why is this person delivering this speech?

  • Did the speaker convince you?

  • Does the speaker’s nonverbal clues agree with his verbal words?


(3)

Notice Delivery Skills


Delivery skills are tools that speakers can use to create a specific effect, usually for a specific purpose.


As you listen to a speech, ask yourself these questions:


Energy and Connection to the Audience

  • Was the speaker enthusiastic? How could you tell?

  • Was there audience interaction? Did you feel connected to the speaker? Did you believe what he was telling you? Did he convince you?

  • Did the speaker make eye contact with the whole audience? Was the speaker talking to his notes?


Props and Visual Aids

  • Were there any props or visual aids? Were they effective?

  • Did they add energy to the presentation or distract from it?

  • Were they clear and easy to read?

  • Would more visual aids have helped?


Physical Presence

  • Did the speaker’s posture display confidence and poise?

  • Were gestures natural and appropriate? Did gestures add to the speech or distract from it?

  • Does the speaker have any distracting mannerisms?


Volume Variety

  • Was the speaker loud enough to hear?

  • Did the speaker vary her tone, speaking sometimes softer and sometimes louder?

  • Was the pace slow enough for you to understand the message?

  • Was the pace sometimes slower and sometimes quicker?

  • Did the speaker pause at times to give emphasis to important points, heighten excitement, or provide drama?


Language

  • Was the language appropriate for the audience?

  • Did the speaker pronounce all her words carefully?

  • Were sentences short and easy to understand?

  • Were unfamiliar terms defined?

  • Did the speaker use repetition, alliteration, figurative language, or other sensory language?

  • Was humor used? Was it appropriate for the audience? Did it lighten the mood?


Overall

  • What was your overall impression of the speaker?

  • What do you think her main message was?

  • Did her words match her body language and other nonverbal communication?


(4)

Ways To Add Interest

Speaking in exactly the way tone of voice, at exactly the same speed, and at exactly the same volume will bore an audience, no matter how interesting the words you say are. On the other hand, an energetic and varied voice will be music to their ears.

Four ways to add interest to your speech are to change volume, change speed, change tone of voice, and use pauses.

Changing Volume

Turning your voice volume up or down adds interest. Use both variations when they match the emotion you want to convey. For example, speaking loudly shows a lot of energy and excitement. Speak softly for sad or serious things.

Changing Speed or Pace

Pace is your speaking rate, and varying it throughout the speech adds great interest. Here are some examples:

  • Speed up to heighten the emotion in a dramatic story

  • Slow down when delivering key phrases that you want the audience to have time to absorb

Changing Tone of Voice

Make your voice match the feeling of your words. If you are speaking of something funny, your voice should be laughing. If you are speaking about something serious, your voice should sound weighty.

Use Pauses

Pauses can be used for many purposes, such as:

  • Giving the audience time to absorb something important.

  • Building suspense by making the audience wait to hear your next line.

  • As a break between major points.

  • After asking a rhetorical question of the audience. This gives the audience time to answer it in their heads.

(5)

Body Language

Think about the difference between listening to the radio and watching television. Which do you prefer?

The way a speaker paces, walks, stands still, flings his hands up, claps, snaps, shakes, taps, smiles, and hundreds of other gestures adds to his speech. This body language makes people interesting to watch and adds another dimension to their message.

Here are a few things to look for:

  • Does the speaker look natural? Are his movements forced? Is he standing too still? Does he seem comfortable and confident in his message?

  • Do the gestures work with the key points he says?

  • Does the speaker use a variety of gestures or just the same one over and over again?

  • Does the speaker show emotions on his face? Does he look like he is bore or like he’s a statue made out of stone?

  • Does the speaker hide behind the podium?

  • Does the speaker stay in only one spot in the very middle of the stage?

  • Overall, what is the speaker’s body language telling you? How did the speech make you feel? Was the speaker convincing?


Extra Help Problems

(1)

Is it better to speed up or slow down your delivery if you want to show excitement? (speed up)

(2)

Is it better to speed up or slow down your delivery if you want to show sadness? (slow down)

(3)

If the speaker starts speaking louder, do you think he is showing excitement or sadness? (excitement)

(4)

If the speaker races through her whole presentation, do you think she is nervous or relaxed? (nervous)

(5)

True or False: Experienced speakers use the same gesture over and over again during one speech. (false)

(6)

True or False: Experienced speakers use a variety of gestures when speaking. (true)

(7)

Is stepping behind a podium or lectern showing the speaker feels open or indicating there might be something to hide? (hiding)

(8)

True or False: No matter how interesting the words of the speech are, if the delivery is boring, the audience will be bored. (true)

(9)

True or False: If the speaker has to rush to fit everything he wants to say into too short of a time, too fast for the audience to absorb. (true)

(10)

True or False: The most effective speakers read word for word from their notes. (false)

(11)

True or False: The most effective speakers speak from memory or from very brief notes. (true)

(12)

True or False: Speakers usually repeat phrases that are not very important. (false)

(13)

True or False: If you want the audience to have time to absorb something, say it really fast. (false)

(14)

True or False: A speaker should stand completely still while speaking so the audience does not get distracted. (false)

(15)

True or False: The speaker’s posture can say “confident” or “unsure” more so than his voice can. (true)

(16)

If a speaker wants to give the audience time to absorb something important, what can he do? (Pause)

(17)

If a speaker wants to build suspense by making the audience wait to hear the next line, what can the speaker do? (Pause)

(18)

If a speaker wants to show a break between major points, what can the speaker do? (Pause)

(19)

If a speaker wants to give the audience time to answer a rhetorical question in their heads, what can the speaker do? (Pause)

(20)

Should the speaker’s pace be faster than normal speaking pace, normal speaking pace, or slower than normal speaking pace? (slower)

(21)

True or False: An experienced speaker should stay in only one spot in the very middle of the stage so he won’t distract the audience. (false)

(22)

True or False: An experienced speaker will always say everything at the same loud volume. (false)

(23)

True or False: An experienced speaker will always say everything at the same pace. (false)

(24)

True or False: A speaker should work to make sure the nonverbal clues match the verbal message. (true)

(25)

True or False: A speaker’s gestures should be timed to match the point she is making. (true)

 

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