5th Grade - Using Verbal Cues, Facial Expressions And Gestures In Oral Presentations

 
     
 
     
 
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5th
Speaking and Listening
Using verbal cues, facial expressions and gestures in oral presentations
Engage the audience with appropriate verbal cues, facial expressions, and gestures.
Be able to use verbal statements, expressions on your face, and body movements to draw the audience’s attention and interest while speaking.
 

Sample Problems

(1)

What is a verbal cue? (words, phrases, and ways of speaking that speakers use to accomplish certain purposes, such as adding emphasis or showing the way the speech is organized)

(2)

What are the reasons speakers use verbal cues? (to emphasize statements in their speeches and to show how the speech is organized)

(3)

What are some examples of verbal cues used for emphasis? (“You need to know”, “This is important”, “Listen carefully”, etc.)

(4)

What are some examples of verbal cues that show the organization of the speech? (“Today we shall discuss”, “The next main point is”, “To summarize”, etc.)

(5)

Asking a rhetorical question is an emphasis, organizational, or stylistic cue? (stylistic cue)

Learning Tips

(1)

Vocabulary


Verbal cues– are words, phrases, or ways of speaking that speakers use to accomplish certain purposes, such as adding emphasis or showing the way the speech is organized.


Emphasis cues- are statements that are used to call attention to important information.


Organizational cues- are statements used to help the listener understand the order, sequence, or relationship of the information in your speech.


Stylistic cues- are statements made in a certain style that call the audience to attention.


(2)

Verbal Cues for Emphasis

Emphasis cues are statements that are used to call attention to important information.

Here are some examples of verbal cues. Pick three to use to emphasize your major points when you are giving a speech.

You need to know……

You need to note……

You need to understand……

You need to remember ……

You need to think about……

This is important……

This is key……

This is essential……

Listen carefully……

Let me emphasize……

Let me repeat……

Let me explain……

Let me make clear……

Why is it?

Why is that important?

Why should you care?

(3)

Verbal Cues for Organizing

Organizational cues are statements used to help the listener understand the order, sequence, or relationship of the information in your speech.

Here are a few examples of cues that help organize:

Today we shall discuss….

In conclusion……

To introduce….

First of all….

Second…..

Third….

Then….

Next…..

The next main point is….

As a result…..

The main ideas I will tell you about are…..

To summarize……

To review……

To recap……

(4)

Verbal Cues for Style

Stylistic cues are statements made in a certain style that call the audience to attention.

Examples of style cues include:

Repeating words or phrases for emphasis

Spelling out important words

Pausing so the audience has time to absorb important information

Speaking more slowly

Speaking more loudly

Asking rhetorical questions for the audience to answer silently

(5)

Moving During Your Speech


Sigmund Freud wrote, "IF his lips are silent, he chatters with his fingertips; betrayal oozes out of him at every pore." As you make a speech, you need to be aware of your movements, from your face to your fingertips.


You want to move naturally while speaking. Your movements give your audience something to look at and keep them interested.


Make sure to practice your movements in front of a mirror, and then in front of your family or friends so they can give you honest feedback about how your gestures look. You might think they are natural, friendly looking movements when they come across as stiff or jerky.


(6)

Eye Contact


Eye contact can indicate interest, attention, and involvement, so you want to make eye contact with your audience. That way, you show them you are interested in them and hope they return your attention. A good goal is to make eye contact with every person in the audience by the time your speech is over. You don’t want to glance around too quickly, but you don’t want to stare at just one or two people either. Try to look at a member of the audience, say a phrase (or sentence) and watch it sink in. Then look on to the next person.


When you watch speakers, notice how they move their face, head, and eyes. Simple movements such as winking, nodding, or even rolling your eyes can say a lot.


Extra Help Problems

(1)

True or False: You should practice using gestures when you practice saying your speech. (true)

(2)

True or False: You should try to make eye contact with each person in the audience. (true)

(3)

True or False: It’s okay to only look at one or two people while you are speaking to a group. (false)

(4)

True or False: As a speaker, your gestures, eye contact, and body language say as much as your words do. (true)

(5)

True or False: When you practice your speech, you should focus only on saying the words correctly. (false)

(6)

True or False: When you deliver a speech, you should stand in only one place and not move around at all. (false)

(7)

True or False: When you deliver a speech, you should use phrases that let the listeners know how you have organized your speech. (true)

(8)

True or False: When you deliver a speech, you should use phrases that emphasize certain points to let the listeners know what to focus on. (true)

(9)

True or False: When you deliver a speech, you should use stylistic methods such as asking rhetorical questions. (true)

(10)

True or False: When you deliver a speech, you should keep your hands clasped behind your back. (false)

(11)

True or False: When you deliver a speech, you should speak in the same tone the entire time. (false)

(12)

True or False: When you deliver a speech, you should keep your eyes glued to your notes so you don’t loose your place. (false)

(13)

True or False: When you deliver a speech, you should keep your hands still so you don’t distract the audience. (false)

(14)

True or False: When you deliver a speech, you should keep your hands face still and serious. (false)

(15)

True or False: When you deliver a speech, you should keep your knees locked. (false)

(16)

True or False: When you deliver a speech, you should make natural but bold gestures. (true)

(17)

True or False: When you deliver a speech, you should smile the entire time. (false)

(18)

True or False: When you deliver a speech, all of your movements, including scratching or picking, communicate a message to your listeners. (true)

(19)

True or False: When you deliver a speech, you should be aware of how all of your body parts are moving, not just your mouth. (true)

(20)

True or False: Before you deliver a speech, you should think of gestures that can add meaning or emphasis to your words. (true)

(21)

True or False: Before you deliver a speech, you should practice in front of a small audience, such as your family, who will give you honest feedback about your words, gestures, and expressions. (true)

(22)

Why would you repeat a phrase during a speech? (to give it emphasis and call attention to it)

(23)

Why would you spell out a word during a speech? (to give it emphasis and call attention to it)

(24)

Should the speaker give the audience a little time to think about a rhetorical question or should the speaker ask several rhetorical questions all at once? (give the audience a little time for each one)

(25)

True or False: The speaker expects the audience to call out the answer to a rhetorical question. (false)

 

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