5th Grade - Clarify And Support Ideas Using Evidence And Examples

 
     
 
     
 
Newsletters:
 
     
 
 
5th
Speaking and Listening
Clarify and support ideas using evidence and examples
Clarify and support spoken ideas with evidence and examples.
Be able to use numbers, statistics, examples, definitions, and quotations to explain ideas out loud.
 

Sample Problems

(1)

True or False: It’s a good idea to use as many numbers and statistics as you can so you sound impressive. (false)

(2)

What can you use to explain your ideas aloud? (You can use examples, definitions, statistics, numbers, comparisons, or quotations)

(3)

Should you make your examples simpler when you write them down or when you speak them aloud? (when you speak them aloud)

(4)

Is it sometimes, always, or never okay to use personal examples in your speech? (sometimes, depending on your audience)

(5)

True or False: You should use complicated comparisons when you are speaking so your audience can tell how smart you are. (false)

Learning Tips

(1)

Vocabulary


Rounding– estimating the number up or down


Statistics- a meaningful numbera taken from the analysis of a collection of data


(2)

Many Types of Support


There are many ways you can support or clarify your ideas when you are speaking. Variety makes for the best speech, so use some numbers, some specific examples, and some explanations. Make sure your sources are reliable and appropriate.


Here are explanations of a few speaking techniques:


Quotations: Less is More


Quotations can be very powerful, but you don’t want to overuse them. Choose the best three or four quotes from a variety of sources. Also, make sure you can pronounce the name of the person you are quoting correctly!


Definitions


When you define a term for your audience, don’t quote the dictionary. Put the definition in your own words and give examples of it.

Use Everyday Comparisons

When you are speaking, try to use less complicated comparisons. For example, when Leo Durocher was manager of the Dodgers, he was asked to explain one of his decisions. He replied, “Baseball is like church. Many attend. Few understand.” He made a simple comparison that his audience could understand.


Powerful Personal Examples


If you are giving a speech about something that is meaningful to you, you can let your audience know why it is so important to you. You can say “I am left-handed, and my grandfather, mother, and cousin are all left-handed.” However, you should think about whether personal examples are appropriate for your audience.


(3)

Numbers, Numbers, Everywhere


Estimate Numbers When Saying Them Aloud

It’s easier to understand exact numbers when you see them. When you are using numbers in a speech, make it easier on your audience by rounding. These are phrases you can use when rounding:


about, almost, at least, at most, not more than, a minimum of, a maximum of


For example, it’s better to say “almost a million people” instead of “985,963 people”.


Use Only A Few Numbers

Too many numbers will confuse your audience. Choose the best three or four and use them. Don’t use too many!


Make your numbers have impact. For example, say “In the time it takes you to listen to this speech, ten children will have gotten chicken pox across the country.”


Also, you should try to use images that your audience can picture. For example, instead of saying “it is 250 yards long”, say “it is almost the length of two football fields”.

(4)

Simplify Statistics

Think about how you can use your statistics in the clearest way possible. For example, instead of saying “this year the city will give out this many tickets,” say instead “this year the city will give out an average of two tickets per person”. The per person statistic is more meaningful to your audience than the overall number would be.

(5)

Analyze Speeches


History is full of famous speeches. Pretend you are a speech teacher and grade some of them! You can find them in books or online. There are speeches from famous politicians, leaders, and even ordinary people. Find at least three speeches and read them out loud to yourself or your friends. What did you like about the support they used? What worked and what didn’t?


Extra Help Problems

(1)

True or False: You should quote from the dictionary when you give a definition. (false)

(2)

True or False: Variety makes for the best speech, so use some numbers, some specific examples, and some explanations. (true)

(3)

True or False: Make sure any source that you use is reliable and appropriate. (true)

(4)

True or False: A few sources you use can be questionable since odds are low that someone will ask you about them. (false)

(5)

True or False: You should decide on the type of support you want to use (such as statistics, specific examples, quotations, or definitions) and just use that type. (false)

(6)

True or False: If you use a quote, it’s okay if you mispronounce the name of the person who said it. (false)

(7)

True or False: You should try to use as many quotes as you can, since the words from famous people carry more weight than yours do. (false)

(8)

True or False: You should say statistics that are as complicated as possible because they sound more impressive. (false)

(9)

True or False: You should use as many statistics as you can so you sound like you know what you’re talking about. (false)

(10)

What are some words that indicate you are rounding a number? (about, almost, at least, at most, not more than, a minimum of, a maximum of)

(11)

True or False: When you are expanding on your ideas out loud, you should make sure that your audience realizes you know much more than they do. (false)

(12)

True or False: You should work hard to become an expert on a topic so you know a lot about it before you have to speak about it. (true)

(13)

True or False: You should start your speech with a lot of details and make the audience guess what your main topic is supposed to be. (false)

(14)

True or False: You should never round your numbers. (false)

(15)

True or False: It is only okay to use exact numbers. (false)

(16)

True or False: You should round your numbers so it is easier for your audience to understand them. (true)

(17)

True or False: When you are speaking, your goal is to prove how much you know. (false)

(18)

True or False: When you are speaking, your goal is to help your audience understand your topic. (true)

(19)

True or False: When you clarify an idea out loud, you need to say everything you know about it. (false)

(20)

True or False: You should know who your audience is and try to figure out the best way to explain your ideas to them. (true)

(21)

True or False: You should treat your audience exactly the same, even if the audience is a group of professors or preschoolers. (false)

(22)

Why should you keep your examples and evidence simple when you speak them out loud? (It’s easier for an audience to follow your ideas when they are simple to listen to, and the audience can’t go back and reread like they could if your examples were written down)

(23)

What does it mean to round a number? (to estimate it higher or lower so that it’s an easier number to deal with)

(24)

About how many quotations should you use in a five minute speech? (three or four at most)

(25)

What is a statistic? (a meaningful number taken from the analysis of a collection of data)

 

Related Games

 
 

Copyright ©2009 Big Purple Hippos, LLC