5th Grade - Writing Research Reports - Parts 1, 2 And 3

 
     
 
     
 
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5th
Writing
Writing research reports - parts 1, 2 and 3
Write research reports about important ideas, issues, or events by using the following guidelines: 3. Develop the topic with simple facts, details, examples, and explanations.
Be able to expand on your thesis and main supporting ideas with strong evidence.
 

Sample Problems

(1)

What are supportive details? (facts, examples, and explanations that prove your ideas)

(2)

True or False: Each body paragraph needs supportive details. (true)

(3)

True or False: You should use just your opinions and beliefs to support your main ideas. (false)

(4)

True or False: Vague generalizations are as effective as specific facts in making your case. (false)

(5)

Is it better to include or take out details that don’t relate to your thesis? (take out distracting details)

Learning Tips

(1)

Vocabulary


Supporting details– specific facts, details, examples, and explanations that prove your ideas.


Topic sentence- a sentence that says the main idea of a body paragraph (in the middle of the report).


Body paragraphs- the paragraphs after the introduction and before your conclusion


(2)

The Process of Writing a Research Report


To write a research report, you start by finding accurate, relevant, and appropriate information and taking notes on that information. You create an outline to organize it, and then you come up with a strong thesis statement.


Now, as you write the paper, you need to make sure you develop the topic clearly and strongly. All of your details should not only relate to your topic but should also “prove” your thesis. Read through some sample research reports (ask your teacher to let you borrow some if you need to) and notice how the best writers relate all of the details in all of the paragraphs back to the thesis.


(3)

Body Paragraphs


Your introduction and conclusion paragraphs should be interesting and focused on your thesis. The body paragraphs are where you must include specific details to support your main ideas.


Each body paragraph should have its own topic sentence (or main idea) and then supportive details to back it up. You should be able to take these from your outline.


Once you have written your body paragraphs, read each paragraph in a different way to help you focus on each sentence: read the last sentence of the paragraph first, then the next sentence, and so on. As you go, notice if each sentence ties back to the topic sentence for that paragraph. Then make sure your topic sentence relates to the thesis of your whole report.


(4)

Finding Your Details


All of your details, facts, and other supporting evidence should come from reliable sources. Your list of sources, or bibliography, is your chance to show off how much research you did and, at the same time, make sure you give credit to your sources.


You will need to list the author, title, publisher, and place and date of publication for most sources. For Internet sources, be sure to list the Web site address and the date you accessed the site. If you don’t know some of the needed information, go back to the source to try to find it.


(5)

Offering Proof


Your body paragraphs are the place where you offer proof of your thesis and main ideas. Be as specific and focused as you can be. Think of yourself as a lawyer in court, proving the case with specific facts. Don’t rely on your own opinion, or, even worse, vague generalizations. Would a jury believe a lawyer who just pointed his finger at the criminal and made vague claims? Of course not. Consider the case you want to make and then make sure you fill in with facts.


Extra Help Problems

(1)

True or False: Details and supporting evidence should only go at the very end of your research report. (false)

(2)

True or False: Your details need to relate to your topic, but not your thesis. (false)

(3)

True or False: You should include examples so your readers can understand better what you mean. (true)

(4)

True or False: You should explain terms that your readers might not be familiar with. (true)

(5)

True or False: You should use quotes sparingly. (true)


(6)

True or False: You should choose quotes that will have a strong impact. (true)

(7)

True or False: You should use several quotes in each paragraph. (false)

(8)

True or False: You should avoid using any quotes in your research report. (false)

(9)

True or False: A research report needs to have facts in it. (true)

(10)

What is a fact? (something that can be proven true)

(11)

What is an opinion? (something someone believes)

(12)

Is this a fact or an opinion? The girl is wearing the blue dress. (fact)

(13)

Is this a fact or an opinion? The girl is the best one to model the blue dress. (opinion)

(14)

Which paragraphs in your research report must include supportive details? (the body paragraphs)

(15)

True or False: The supportive details in a body paragraph should support that paragraph’s topic sentence. (true)

(16)

What is a topic sentence? (the main idea for that paragraph)

(17)

True or False: You should restate your thesis in every paragraph. (false)

(18)

True or False: Each body paragraph should have a topic sentence. (true)

(19)

What is a body paragraph? (the paragraphs after the introduction and before your conclusion)

(20)

True or False: You should not try to include too much information into each paragraph. (true)

(21)

Which is a stronger detail: A) The boxes arrived. B) The cardboard boxes arrived at two minutes after ten in the morning. (B)

(22)

Which is a vague generalization: A) All the children agreed. B) The twelve boys and ten girls agreed that the party was a good idea. (A)

(23)

Which makes a stronger point: A) The light bulb wastes too much energy. B) The incandescent light bulb produces more heat than light, and the energy that becomes heat is wasted. (B)

(24)

Which is an opinion: A) The light bulb wastes too much energy. B) The incandescent light bulb produces more heat than light, and the energy that becomes heat is wasted. (A)

(25)

Which is the strongest detail: a vague generalization, a fact, and specific fact, or an opinion? (A specific fact)

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