5th Grade - Writing Narratives And Essays

 
     
 
     
 
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5th
Writing
Writing narratives and essays
Write narratives: Establish a plot, point of view, setting, and conflict, Show rather than tell the events of the story
Be able to write a story, usually based on personal experience, that has a message to the reader and includes all the story elements, such as a logical plot and resolution, point of view (usually first person), sensory details that help show instead of tell, and a clear setting.
 

Sample Problems

(1)

________ person point of view uses “I”, as in “I ran down the street.” (First)

(2)

________ person point of view uses “she”, as in “She ran down the street.” (Third)

(3)

True or False: When you show instead of tell, the reader cares more about your story. (true)

(4)

What are the three types of essays you could write? (Narrative, informational, and persuasive)

(5)

True or False: A narrative is a story with a message. (true)

Learning Tips

(1)

Vocabulary


Narrative- a story with a message.


Show don’t tell”– writers to write in a manner that allows the reader to experience the story through a character's senses, words, and feelings rather than through the narrator's explicitly stating things. Sensory details contribute to “showing.”


Sensory details- describing things according to the sense of smelling, touching, hearing, seeing, and tasting,

First person point of view- is written as if the writer is participating in the story, using “I”, and speaks directly to the reader. This narrator doesn’t know what other people are thinking or saying when he’s not with them.


Third person point of view- is written as if the narrator is not participating in the story but tells us about the characters using “he” and “she”.


(2)

Show, Don’t Tell


When you explicitly state something in a story, you are “telling” the reader about it. When you let the reader experience it for herself through vivid details, you are "showing" it. Showing embraces readers more, so that they feel like it is happening to them, not just happening on the pages of a book. Using sensory details, or details that appeal to the sense of smell, touch, hearing, seeing, and tasting, is a great way to draw the reader into your story.


Here is an example of the difference between showing and telling:


Telling: It was a hot day.


Showing: Jake took off his jacket and wiped the sweat off his forehead with his napkin. Then he tried to fan himself with it, but it was too limp to do any good.


(3)

How To Write A Narrative: Try it out!


Everyone has been nervous at some time in her life. Think of when you felt really nervous. Where were you? What were you going to have to do or what was going on? What did you see and hear? What did you feel like? Was anyone else with you? What did you do, and how did you feel after it was all over?


You are to write a five-paragraph essay about a time you were nervous.

Take the time to plan the essay by doing the following:

1. Choose your main idea. Build your essay around a central point, a main idea that your story explains. You want to capture a truth about your life and use the story, the narrative experience, to show how you changed or grew because of that experience. If it was meaningful to you, then it will be meaningful to readers as well.

2. Provide a good opening so the reader will become interested. See if you can also include details about the setting in your opening.


3. Choose how you are going to develop the essay and write down which main points that you are going to use.


4. What do you want to say about each main point or event? Choose wisely so that you emphasize the most important parts with specific details. How are you going to make the reader feel he is seeing or feeling what’s happening along with you. Write down those details.


5. How are you going to make a transition from one paragraph to the other? Are you going to do it in the last sentence of the paragraphs or the first? Remember to use transition words.


6. How are you going to conclude or end your narrative? How can you summarize your main idea in a way that is memorable for readers?


7. Read over and check the paragraphs for the following: Spelling errors, punctuation errors, grammar errors, lack of variety in sentence structure, inclusion of sentence fragments, and lack of sensory detail. Once you’ve corrected those mistakes, you have written a narrative essay!


(4)

Charades


Its’ important to show characters’ feelings instead of telling them. It’s easy to say “he was sad”, but using details to show it will have a much stronger impact on your readers.


Practice showing by playing a game of charades with your friends. When it’s your turn, you draw a card that describes something (“You just got a puppy!” or “Your mother made you mad”). Then you have to act it out so the other players can guess what you mean—without saying anything. How can you SHOW what you mean?


Think about this activity when you are writing your narratives. Pretend you can’t state it directly and see how you can show what you mean instead.


(5)

Narrative Checklist

When you are finished writing your narrative, make sure you have included everything you need to by reading through this checklist:

  • Story line is organized in an engaging, effective way with a clear a beginning, middle, and end

  • You have included a problem and the solution

  • Your point of view stays the same through the whole essay

  • You have a clear setting (place and time)

  • You chose words that create vivid pictures

  • You included relevant and descriptive sensory details

  • You have developed characters

  • You used a variety of sentence structures

  • You followed the rules of grammar and used correct spelling

Extra Help Problems

(1)

When you show something instead of telling it, you don’t explicitly state it. (true)

(2)

If the characters indicate something with their actions, is that showing or telling? (showing)

(3)

When you explicitly state something, are you showing or telling it? (telling)

(4)

You should include personal feeling in your narratives. (true)

(5)

You should include concrete details in your narratives. (true)

(6)

Your details need to create a unified, dominant impression. (true)

(7)

True or False: The events in narratives usually follow chronological order. (true)

(8)

Which kind of prompt is this: Write the story of Red Riding Hood from the wolf’s point of view. (narrative)

(9)

True or False: This prompt is asking you to write a narrative: Write about a time you had a narrow escape. (true)

(10)

True or False: This prompt is asking you to write a narrative: Write a convincing essay in which you agree or disagree with the idea that life is easier now than it was a century ago. (false)

(11)

True or False: This prompt is asking you to write a narrative: Write an essay starting with the line “You won't believe it, but here's what happened ...” (true)

(12)

True or False: This prompt is asking you to write a narrative: Write a clear explanation of how to make your favorite dish. (false)

(13)

True or False: This prompt is asking you to write a narrative: Would you rather be an only child or have a big family? Why? (false)

(14)

True or False: This prompt is asking you to write a narrative: Many famous people, both real and fictional, have been honored by having their faces on postage stamps. Choose a real or fictional person who you feel deserves this honor. Write a paper that would persuade others. (false)

(15)

True or False: This prompt is asking you to write a narrative: Think about the worse birthday you have had. Tell what happened. (true)

(16)

True or False: This prompt is asking you to write a narrative: Write a letter to your grandchildren, telling them what being a fifth grader is like today. (true)

(17)

True or False: This prompt is asking you to write a narrative: Write an essay explaining how to write a good essay. (false)

(18)

True or False: This prompt is asking you to write a narrative: Write about a time you felt you learned something unexpected. (true)

(19)

True or False: This prompt is asking you to write a narrative:

(20)

True or False: This prompt is asking you to write a narrative:

(21)

_________ details appeal to the sense of smell, touch, hearing, seeing, and tasting. (Sensory)


(22)

True or False: Adding sensory details is a great way to show instead of tell. (true)

(23)

True or False: The events in a narrative must follow a logical order. (true)

(24)

An essay that is written in the first person perspeective and tells a story is a __________ essay. (narrative)

(25)

True or False: It’s okay to use first person point of view in some parts of your narrative and a third person’s perspective in others. (false)

 

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