5th Grade - Writing Multiple-paragraph Compositions, Part 2

 
     
 
     
 
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5th
Writing
Writing multiple-paragraph compositions, part 2
Create multiple-paragraph expository compositions: establish a topic, important ideas, or events in sequence or chronological order, provide details and transitional expressions that link one paragraph to another in a clear line of thought, offer a conclu
Be able to write a five-paragraph essay that explains a topic in an organized way: start the introductory paragraph with a catchy opening and a statement of the thesis; write three body paragraphs that each explain a main supportive idea and details; and conclude with a paragraph that summarizes the thesis and main supporting ideas in a memorable way.
 

Sample Problems

(1)

What is another name for an expository essay? (informational essay)

(2)

Where does your thesis statement go in an expository essay? (in the first paragraph)

(3)

Where does your conclusion go in an expository essay? (in the last paragraph)

(4)

How many body paragraphs should you have in an expository essay? (at least three)

(5)

True or False: An expository essay should try to convince the reader to agree with the author’s opinion or point of view. (false)

Learning Tips

(1)

Vocabulary


Expository essay– a five-paragraph essay that presents information or explains how to do something. It is also called an informational essay.


Thesis- a statement of the main idea of your essay.


(2)

The Introduction, Main Body, and Conclusion


In expository essays, you may give directions on how to do something, explain how a process works, or answer a specific question. Expository essays focus on what readers need to know and understand. They provide information and explain who, what, when, why, and how. Now that you know the general idea, here is what goes into each specific paragraph:


In the introduction paragraph, the first sentence generally sets the tone and should catch the reader’s attention. Then the paragraph goes from general to specific. State your thesis (or main idea). Then say your three important points or three events that you will describe, one per paragraph, in your main body paragraphs.


The main body of the essay is usually three paragraphs long. For each body paragraph, you state that paragraph’s topic sentence (or main event or fact), and then you give details that support it. Each body paragraph focuses on a different fact or event.


The conclusion restates the main idea of the essay- but not in the same exact words that you used before- and reminds the reader of the three major points you made in your three body paragraphs. It should wrap up your essay in a memorable way, but not introduce new issues.

(3)

Graphic Organizer

Fill in this graphic organizer to organize your essay before you being writing.

TOPIC:

Main Idea (Thesis):





Catchy Opening Sentence:





Supporting Event/Idea 1:



Details:

Supporting Event/Idea 2:



Details:


Supporting Event/Idea 3:



Details:
















Conclusion:

Restate Thesis-

Restate 3 Supporting Events/Ideas-

Memorable Ending-








(4)

Types of Expository Essays


There are six main types of expository essays, and you get to choose the one that best fits your topic and thesis. They are listed below, along with the way they are organized (in parenthesis):


1. Explaining a process (chronological order)

2. Comparing or contrasting two items (order of importance)

3. Identifying a cause-effect relationship (either cause or effect can go first)

4. Explaining with examples (order of importance)

5. Dividing and classifying (order of importance)

6. Defining (order of importance)


The order in which you present your three main supporting ideas depends on which of these six methods you choose. In chronological order, you explain the steps in the order you would do them, such as which goes first, second, third, etc. In order of importance, you typically start with your strongest reason and then your next strongest, and so on.


(5)

Transitional Words


To help the reader follow your logic, link your sentences and paragraphs with effective transitional expressions. Here are some transitional words to consider when you are writing:


To Show Addition:

moreover, further, furthermore, besides, and, and then, likewise, also, nor, too, again, in addition, equally important, next, first, second, third, in the first place, in the second place, finally, last.


To Compare or Contrast:

similarly, likewise, in like manner, but, yet, and yet, however, still, nevertheless, on the other hand, on the contrary, even so, notwithstanding, for all that, in contrast to this, at the same time, although this may be true, otherwise, nonetheless.


Concluding:

in conclusion, to sum up, in brief, on the whole, in sum, in short, as I have said, in other words, that is, to be sure, as has been noted, for example, for instance, in fact, indeed, to tell the truth, in any event.


Extra Help Problems

(1)

True or False: It’s a good idea to introduce a new issue in your concluding paragraph. (false)

(2)

True or False: Your topic should be pretty broad so that you have a lot of things to cover in your essay. (false)

(3)

True or False: Transition phrases are important because they help the reader follow along and reinforce your logic. (true)

(4)

True or False: Expository essays are usually written using the pronoun “I”. (false)

(5)

True or False: You should have a strong knowledge of your topic so that you can explain the ideas clearly to your readers. (true)

(6)

True or False: Expository essays may contain statistics, facts, comparisons, and cause and effect examples to help the reader understand the points being made. (true)

(7)

True or False: Expository essays usually include the writer’s opinion. (false)

(8)

True or False: Expository essays are usually written from the third person perspective. (true)

(9)

True or False: Expository essays are usually arranged in a clear, logical way so that readers can easily find what they need to know. (true)

(10)

True or False: Expository essays include other people’s views or reports about an event or situation. (true)

(11)

True or False: Expository essays usually tell a story and include different characters. (false)

(12)

Sandy wants to write an informational essay about arranging bouquets for weddings. Since her mom is a professional florist, she knows too much about it! Which of the following is specific enough to be her thesis?


a) Flower arranging is fun.

b) To arrange flowers properly, you need to look at them from all angles.

c) To arrange flowers for weddings, you need to know the preferences of the bride and groom.


(c)

(13)

Sandy wants to write an informational essay about arranging bouquets for weddings. Since her mom is a professional florist, she knows too much about it! Which of the following is a good specific detail?

a) Flower arranging is fun.

b) To arrange flowers properly, you need to look at them from all angles.

c) To arrange flowers for weddings, you need to know the preferences of the bride and groom.


(b)

(14)

Sandy wants to write an informational essay about arranging bouquets for weddings. Since her mom is a professional florist, she knows too much about it! Which is too general for a thesis statement?


a) Flower arranging is fun.

b) To arrange flowers properly, you need to look at them from all angles.

c) To arrange flowers for weddings, you need to know the preferences of the bride and groom.


(a)

(15)

Which is NOT a common type of expository essays?

a) Explaining a process

b) Comparing or contrasting two items

c) Explaining with examples

d) Persuading with examples


(d)

(16)

What is the purpose of an expository essay? (to inform or explain)

(17)

True or False: It’s best start with details and let the reader guess what your thesis is. (false)

(18)

True or False: You should restate your thesis in your concluding paragraph in the exact same words you used in the introduction. (false)

(19)

True or False: Each body paragraph should focus on one main supporting idea. (true)

(20)

True or False: Each body paragraph should include supporting details or examples. (true)

(21)

True or False: You should add supporting details that didn’t fit anywhere else to the conclusion. (false)

(22)

True or False: You should avoid using phrases such as “in conclusion”, “next”, “in addition”, “then”. (false)

(23)

True or False: Your conclusion should introduce more topics the reader might want to look into. (false)

(24)

True or False: You can organize your essay in whichever order the ideas come to you. (false)

(25)

True or False: If you expository essay explains a process, it’s a good idea to organize the steps in chronological order. (true)

 

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