4th Grade - Verbs, Adverbs, Prepositions And Conjunctions

 
     
 
     
 
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4th
Grammar
Verbs, adverbs, prepositions and conjunctions
Identify and use regular and irregular verbs, adverbs, prepositions, and coordinating conjunctions in writing and speaking.
The ability to identify parts of speech including regular and irregular verbs, adverbs, prepositions, and coordinating conjunctions and use them accurately in speech and writing.
 

Sample Problems

(1)

What are parts of speech? (parts of complete sentences – verbs, nouns, adjectives, adverbs, etc.)

(2)

What is the function of a verb? (what is happening, the action)

(3)

What is the function of a noun? (often the subject of the sentence – person, place, thing, or idea)

(4)

What is the function of an adverb? (modifies or describes a verb or adjective)

(5)

What is the function of an adjective? (describing the noun or subject)

Learning Tips

(1)

Get 6 lunch-sized paper bags, small bowls or containers. Label each with the different parts of speech: nouns, verbs, adverbs, prepositions, conjunctions, adjectives. If it helps, put some examples on the label. Then take any text or speech in full sentences and break it into pieces – one word per piece of paper. Sort the words into the correct bags. Then randomly select words on pieces of paper from each bag to see what sentences you can make!

Example:

I badly wanted to go over to Sarah’s house but I wasn’t ready.

↓ ↓ ↓ ↓ ↓ ↓ ↓ ↓ ↓ ↓ ↓ ↓ ↓

noun, adverb, verb, preposition, verb, preposition, noun, noun, conjunction, noun, verb, adjective

(2)

To make the parts of speech sort (Learning Tip #1) more challenging, get a few more containers and label them with these more specific parts of speech: plural nouns, common nouns, proper nouns, pronouns, regular verbs, and irregular verbs. Then sort the previously sorted nouns and verbs into these categories.

Example:

I, I = pronoun wanted = regular verb (past tense)

Sarah’s = proper noun wasn’t, go = irregular verbs (present tense)

house = common noun

(3)

Fill in your name grid – draw a table on a piece of paper with enough rows (up and down) to have one row for one letter of your first name and 4 columns. Label the columns as Nouns, Verbs, Adverbs, and Adjectives. It works like an acronym – fill in the part of speech corresponding to that letter of your name. Try to think of words that describe you. At the end, try to make silly sentences using all the words in one row or one column.

Example:

Name

Nouns

Verbs

Adverbs

Adjectives

S

snake

slide

sadly

silly

A

atlas

ate

ably

artsy

M

moon

meet

meaningfully

messy

Sentences:

The snake acts silly when it slides sadly down the sidewalk.

She is very artsy and messy when working on silly art.


(4)

Play madlibs with someone whether you by the templates (very inexpensive) or make your own. You can make your own by copying text or your own writing and whiting out a word every 5-7 words. Then label the parts of speech of the missing words. Ask your partner for examples of each of those parts of speech, writing them in as they say them. Then read the entire text/ story together, laughing at the silly substitutions!

(5)

Write sentences without using prepositions (over, around, atop, beneath, against, on, beside, during, etc.) or conjunctions (for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so, etc.). If needed, write a sentence properly and then erase/ take out the prepositions. See how funny they sound – they shouldn’t make much sense! Even those little words are very important to include in complete sentences!

Examples:

My kitty is always next to me on the couch. My kitty is me the couch.

They used to bring lots of presents to the neighbors next door. They used bring lots presents the neighbors door.

Extra Help Problems

(1)

What is the function of a conjunction? (a word that links words, phrases, or clauses)

(2)

What is the function of a preposition? (a word that links nouns, pronouns and phrases to other words in a sentence)

(3)

What are examples of prepositions? (temporal, spatial, or logical relationship between object and its location – over, around, atop, beneath, against, on, beside, during, etc.)

(4)

What are examples of conjunctions? (FANBOYS – for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so, etc.)

(5)

What are examples of common nouns? (dog, zoo, blanket, wallet, paper, etc.)

(6)

What are examples of proper nouns? (Los Angeles Times, Disneyland, Mrs. Smith, California, etc.)

(7)

What are examples of pronouns? (he, they, we, it, etc.)

(8)

What are examples of regular verbs? (walk, skip, bounce, flick, etc.)

(9)

What are examples of irregular verbs? (eat, meet, fry, sit, fly, etc.)

(10)

What are examples of adverbs? (patiently, quickly, playfully, listlessly, etc.)

(11)

What are examples of adjectives? (red, enormous, soft, rough, etc.)

(12)

Are all parts of speech important and necessary? (yes!)

(13)

What are the major parts of speech in a sentence? (subject and predicate – noun and verb)

(14)

What are helping parts of speech in a sentence? (prepositions, conjunctions, verb phrases, etc.)

(15)

What resources and/or strategies can you use to determine the part of speech of a word? (context, dictionary, apposition – sentence structure, word structure)

(16)

What part of speech is “the” usually? (adjective)

(17)

What part of speech is “as” usually? (conjunction)

(18)

What part of speech are “my”, “his”, “their”, and “her”? Why? (they are all adjectives because they show possession – the describe the possession of a thing)

(19)

What part of speech is “a” usually? (indefinite article – functions differently depending on the context)

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