6th Grade - Analyzing The Evidence For Author's Conclusions

 
     
 
     
 
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6th
Reading and Comprehension
Analyzing the evidence for author's conclusions
Determine the adequacy and appropriateness of the evidence for an author's conclusions.
Evaluate the evidence for an author’s conclusions.
 

Sample Problems

(1)

Why do people say “Don’t believe everything you read?” What makes some sources credible (believable) and some not?


(2)

What kinds of questions should you ask about what you are reading to determine if it is accurate (the facts are correct)?


(3)

How do authors try to prove their point or convince readers to agree with their conclusions (what they believe the facts are proving)?


(4)

What makes a text seem believable or reliable (trustworthy) to you?


(5)

How do authors use evidence (facts) to help support their position?


(6)

What are some sources that you trust and/or agree with?


Learning Tips

(1)

Read the article “What is Out?” (about what happens to trash) at http://www.kid-at-art.com/htdoc/educate.html. As you read, look for places where the author is trying to convince the reader to take his point of view.

(2)

List the evidence the author uses to make his argument (we should recycle).


(3)

Where does this evidence come from? Can you tell from the article?


(4)

What additional information would be useful in strengthening the author’s argument? What questions did the article leave you with?


(5)

Were you convinced by this article?

(6)

Where could you look to find additional information about this issue?


Extra Help Problems

(1)

Trace the author’s argument about recycling tires in http://earth911.org/automotive/benefits-of-recycling-tires/. What evidence, or facts, does he use to make his point? How convincing is this article to you?

(2)

Research the most environmentally friendly cars and write a persuasive article, targeted to your parents, explaining why their next car should be that one. Be sure to use evidence to support your arguments.

(3)

Read about “green shopping” at http://earth911.org/shopping/green-shopping-tips/. Take an inventory of the products in your house and determine if you are shopping “green.” If not, explain to your family what needs to change, using evidence from the article.

(4)


Read the Bush administration’s statement on “Protecting the Environment” at http://www.whitehouse.gov/infocus/environment/ and trace its use of evidence. What is our government’s current position on environmental protection, and what actions are they taking?

(5)


Using what you have learned, explain how you can determine if information is reliable.

(6)


If you found a set of encyclopedias from 1975 in your basement, why would they not be a great source of information for a research paper?

(7)


If your friend at school told you that global warming was caused by too much homework, could you use him as a source in your research paper? Why not?

(8)


What sources would be good to use for a research paper on global warming? How do you know?

 

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