6th Grade - Using Simple And Compound Sentences

 
     
 
     
 
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6th
Grammar
Using simple and compound sentences
Use simple, compound, and compound-complex sentences; use effective coordination and subordination of ideas to express complete thoughts.
Be able to generate simple, compound, and compound-complex sentences to express coordinated and subordinated ideas.
 

Sample Problems

(1)

What is a simple sentence? (subject + verb. Example: Some students like to study in the morning.)

(2)

What is a compound sentence? (multiple subjects + multiple verbs, i.e. multiple independent clauses. Example: Some students like to study in the morning, and some students like to study at night.)


(3)

What is a complex sentence? (a sentence that includes a dependent or subordinate clause, a clause that does not make sense on its own. Example: Although some students like to study in the morning, others like to study at night.)

(4)

What is a compound-complex sentence? (a sentence with more than one independent clause as well as subordination. Example: Since students like to study at different times, the library will open early and close late, and this should allow all students to complete their work.)


(5)

What is coordination of ideas? (joining with conjunctions such as and, but, or)


(6)

What is subordination of ideas? (using dependent clauses)

(7)

Why is it important to be able to create more than one type of sentence? (helps with expression of ideas, creates more complex & sophisticated language for writing)

Learning Tips

(1)

Write 3 simple sentences on the subject of frogs.

  1. Frogs come in many colors.

(2)

Compound Sentences


A compound sentence structure shows that two thoughts are connected and of equal importance:

  1. Jenny hid the hen, and Benny tried to hide the cow.

  • Max maintained that the database needed restructuring, but Laura disagreed.


Remember these important characteristics of compound sentences:

  • 1. A compound sentence is like a set of twins; each is a separate person, yet each is connected to the other with the same biological "make-up." That is, each has a subject, a verb, and words to complete the thought. Although they are joined by a linking word, each sentence of the compound is complete in itself and can stand alone.

  • 2. The two parts of the compound sentence need to be linked correctly, with a comma and then a linking word at the place where one sentence ends and the other begins. (Otherwise you will have a sentence error called a run-on sentence. Run-on sentences are typically compound sentences without the proper punctuation and/or linking word.)

3. Because there are two complete sentences in a compound sentence, each has equal weight in terms of the ideas being presented. That is, you may want to link sentences into a compound to show that their ideas are equally important.

Write 3 compound sentences on the subject of frogs and flies.

  1. Frogs eat flies, but flies are not afraid of frogs.


(3)

Dependent Clause (DC)

A dependent clause is a group of words that contains a subject and verb but does not express a complete thought. A dependent clause cannot be a sentence. Often a dependent clause is marked by a dependent marker word.

Example: When Jim studied in the Sweet Shop for his chemistry quiz . . . (DC)
(What happened when he studied? The thought is incomplete.)

Dependent Marker Word (DM)

A dependent marker word is a word added to the beginning of an independent clause that makes it into a dependent clause.

Example: When Jim studied in the Sweet Shop for his chemistry quiz, it was very noisy. (DM)

Some common dependent markers are: after, although, as, as if, because, before, even if, even though, if, in order to, since, though, unless, until, whatever, when, whenever, whether, and while.


Write 3 complex sentences on the subject of frogs, flies, and anything else. Use the dependent marker words to help you.


  1. When the frog saw the fly, he jumped high into the air.



3.


4.




(4)

Constructing Compound-Complex Sentences

A compound-complex sentence is comprised of at least two independent clauses and one or more dependent clauses.

Example: Though Mitchell prefers watching romantic films, he rented the latest spy thriller, and he enjoyed it very much.

Example: Laura forgot her friend's birthday, so she sent her a card when she finally remembered.

Because compound-complex sentences are normally longer than other sentences, it is very important to punctuate them correctly.

Example: Begin with two independent clauses:

The team captain jumped for joy. The fans cheered.

Then combine the independent clauses to form a compound sentence:

The team captain jumped for joy, and the fans cheered.

Now, add a dependent clause to your compound sentence to create a compound-complex sentence.

The team captain jumped for joy, and the fans cheered because we won the state

championship.

OR

When we won the state championship, the team captain jumped for joy, and the fans cheered.

Now write 3 complex sentences on the subject of frogs, flies, and anything else. Use the dependent marker words and examples to help you.


  1. When the frog saw the fly, he jumped high in the air, and the fly became his dinner.










(5)

Identify the sentences as (S) simple, (CO) compound, (CX) complex or (CC) compound-complex.

  1. Juan played football, and Juanita went shopping. (CO)

  2. While Juanita went shopping, Juan played football, but they both got home at 6:00. (CC)

  3. Juan and Juanita left the house at 10:00. (S)

  4. Since Juan and Juanita were both out, the house was quiet. (CX)

Extra Help Problems

(1)

Pauline loves to go to the beach and spend her days sunbathing. 


A. Simple Sentence
*

B. Compound Sentence


C. Complex Sentence


D. Compound-Complex Sentence

(2)

Bruno likes the view that he gets from the log cabin up in the mountains, and he enjoys hiking in the forest.

A. Simple Sentence

B. Compound Sentence
*

C. Complex Sentence


D. Compound-Complex Sentence


(3)


Pauline does not like chopping wood, swatting mosquitoes, or cooking over a woodstove. 


A. Simple Sentence*


B. Compound Sentence


C. Complex Sentence


D. Compound-Complex Sentence


(4)

Bruno tends to get bored sitting on the beach, watching the waves, getting sand in his swimsuit, and reading detective novels for a week.

A. Simple Sentence
*

B. Compound Sentence


C. Complex Sentence


D. Compound-Complex Sentence


(5)

Bruno went to the White Mountains of New Hampshire, and Pauline went to Cape Cod. 


A. Simple Sentence


B. Compound Sentence
*

C. Complex Sentence


D. Compound-Complex Sentence




(6)


Although Mexico has the better football team, it lost.


A. Simple Sentence

B. Compound Sentence


C. Complex Sentence
*

D. Compound-Complex Sentence


(7)

After Mexico lost the game, fans took to the streets, and they caused a lot of damage.


A. Simple Sentence

B. Compound Sentence


C. Complex Sentence


D. Compound-Complex Sentence*



(8)


The island was filled with many trails winding through the thick underbrush, a small lake, and dangerous wild pig.


A. Simple Sentence*

B. Compound Sentence


C. Complex Sentence


D. Compound-Complex Sentence


(9)


Naoki passed the test because he studied hard and understood the material.


A. Simple Sentence

B. Compound Sentence


C. Complex Sentence
*

D. Compound-Complex Sentence


(10)

The teacher walked into the classroom, greeted the students, and took attendance.


A. Simple Sentence*

B. Compound Sentence


C. Complex Sentence


D. Compound-Complex Sentence


(11)

Revise each sentence by starting with something other than the subject of the sentence or of the independent clause.

 

1.      Chic Young has kept the humor of the comic strip Blondie consistently high for more than twenty-five years.

 

2.      Young keeps farther ahead of the publication dates than any other comic artist, allowing nothing to interfere with his work.

 

3.      Young begins his weekly battle with the deadline promptly at nine o’ clock every Thursday morning.

 

4.      He rises from the breakfast table and shuffles to the drawing board like a man about to mount the scaffold.

 

5.   The Sunday strip is a more complicated job because it requires a series of connected gags.

 

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