6th Grade - Use Clues To Determine Meaning Of Unknown Words

 
     
 
     
 
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6th
Vocabulary
Use clues to determine meaning of unknown words
Monitor expository text for unknown words or words with novel meanings by using word, sentence, and paragraph clues to determine meaning.
Be able to determine meaning of unknown words in expository text through context clues
 

Sample Problems

(1)

What do you do when you are reading and come across an unknown word?

(2)

What do you do when you come across a word you think you know but doesn’t seem to mean what it usually means?

(3)

Are there ways you can figure out the meaning of a word without using a dictionary? Explain.

(4)

Hurry up! We don’t have much crimb!” Is “crimb” a verb, adjective, or noun? How did you know?

(5)

If I said that the thief prevaricated on the witness stand, what would you think that meant? (Lied)

Learning Tips

(1)

Read the poem “Jabberwocky” by Lewis Carroll and discuss possible meanings for the nonsense words.

(2)

Choose an easy section of textbook to photocopy with some words whited out. Be sure the words are easy to guess. Make up nonsense words for the blanks and have your child fill in the missing words. Ask him or her how he knew what the missing word might mean.

(3)

Some contextual clues include punctuation such as parentheses, brackets, and dashes; helping words (“such as,” “that is,” “for example,” “or”); the previous or succeeding sentence. Background knowledge can also help!

(4)

A leech has teeth that puncture the skin of their prey. Then the leech can suck blood through the hole in the skin.” What words help us find the meaning of the word puncture? How would a person learn this word for the first time? Write a new sentence using this word.

(5)

Hey, you cretty dingdang! Stop yullning around and grote vellfully! We can determine the parts of speech of unkown words by their function in a sentence. Cretty (adj); dingdang (n); yull (v); grote (v); vellfully (adv)

Extra Help Problems

(1)

You and your child each choose an interesting article from the newspaper. Highlight novel or unknown words and hypothesize their meaning. Discuss your articles and why you chose them. The next day, see if you can find follow-up articles.

(2)

Make lists of 50 words about a specific topic. See how advanced your words can be: use the Internet or an encyclopedia to get as technical as possible. Discuss how understanding the context can help organize new vocabulary.

(3)

Find examples of college textbooks in a subject of interest and scan for novel vocabulary.

(4)

Make up a funny story using nonsense words.

(5)

Make up a funny poem like “Jabberwocky.”

(6)

Sing a song to a familiar tune but using nonsense words. See if your friends can understand what you’re singing about.

 

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