3rd Grade - Round To Nearest 10, 100, Or 1000

 
     
 
     
 
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3rd
Numbers
Round to Nearest 10, 100, or 1000
Round off numbers to 10,000 to the nearest ten, hundred, and thousand
Number Sense: Rounding to nearest 10,000 The ability to round off numbers to 10,000 to the nearest ten, hundred, and thousand. (To “round off” means to state the value of a number to the nearest ten, hundred, thousand, etc.)
 

Sample Problems

(1)

What does rounding mean? (about how many/estimate) Why do we round off numbers? (estimating can help us solve problems quickly) And how do we do it? (see below)

(2)

What is the rule for rounding? (Look at the number to the right of the place value that you want to round to. If that number is 1-4 round down; 5-9 round up, meaning add one to the digit to the left)

(3)

When would rounding be used in daily life? (shopping—making sure there is enough money to buy the item)

(4)

When is rounding NOT a good method to use? (when an exact figure is needed)

(5)

Round 9,888 to the nearest thousand. (10,000)

Learning Tips

(1)

Sample Problem 2 explains exactly what “rounding off” means.


Learning to round off is a valuable skill at this age when children need to be learning how to manipulate as many numbers as possible “in their heads” without resorting to pencil and paper. You will probably discover that while children can round off on paper, larger numbers, or add together numbers by rounding them off to single digits followed by however many 0s are needed to permit that, they may fumble completely if asked to do this “in their heads.” So, start simply. If rounding off on paper is a challenge, start by using this tip: It is often helpful for children to underline the number that they are rounding to. For example, if children are rounding to the nearest ten, underline the number in the tens place. Follow Learning Tip 2 for another assist to using mental math more confidently. Above all, progress slowly, using small numbers as long as necessary. Becoming confident at manipulating numbers without needing pencil/paper is a very valuable skill and is worth spending the necessary time to accomplish it while children are still young.

(2)

Children are often confused about how many digits to drop (or increase) while changing them to 0s. There is a simple rule. Ask your child to round off 5 or 6 numbers to the nearest 100s place (543 rounded off to 100s is 500; 555 rounded off to the nearest 100s place is 600) and when they have done it correctly have them look at their work until they figure out this rule: If you are rounding off to the nearest 10s, there will be 1 rounded 0 at the end; if you are rounding off to the nearest 100, there will be 2 rounded 0s at the end, for rounding off to the nearest thousand there will be 3 rounded 0s at the end, and for rounding off to the nearest 10,000 there will be 4 rounded zeros at the end. Yes, the number of zeros at the end corresponds to the number of zeros required to say that place-value word (Three zeros is pronounced “thousand” for example.)

(3)

Children can work individually or in teams to quickly round the number that is called aloud. For example, the number 5,455 is called along with a place value, for example, “hundreds”. The child quickly comes up with 5,500 as the answer.

(4)

Mental math problems can be used to challenge children’s ability to round. For example, children may be given a problem such as 30 + 35 rounded to the nearest ten. (70)

(5)

Help children experience when rounding is not appropriate: Give children a certain number of candy skittles or small toys and ask them to round the number to the nearest ten. Then ask them to divide the number of candy/toys equally between two or three people and let them experience the difficulty when they run out of candy/toys. For example, 25 skittles are given, which is 30 rounded. They try to divide that number between three people (thinking each will get 10) and someone always gets less.

(6)

Make a number line across the floor and ask the child to stand on a particular two-digit number. Ask the child to name the 2 tens that he/she is standing between. Ask the child which one he/she is closer to? Tell the child that he/she will round to that nearest ten and say that number. Show examples of rounding down and up, including multiple examples of “5”.

Extra Help Problems

(1)

Round 45 to the nearest ten: 50

(2)

Round 4,589 to the nearest hundred: 4,600

(3)

Round 2,343 to the nearest thousand: 2,000

(4)

Round 20 + 14 to the nearest ten: 30

(5)

Which of the following numbers does not round to 2,000 when rounding to the nearest thousand? (2,346, 2098, 1,999, 2,567)

(6)

Round to the nearest thousand: 98,725 (99,000)

(7)

Round 5,676 to the nearest thousand. (6,000)

(8)

Round 909 to the nearest hundred. (900)

(9)

Round 35+17 to the nearest ten. (50)

(10)

Round 895 + 500 to the nearest thousand. (1,000)

(11)

Round 675 + 435 to the nearest hundred. (1,100)

(12)

Round 10,001 to the nearest ten thousand. (10,000)

(13)

Round 450 to the nearest ten. (450)

(14)

Round 450 to the nearest hundred. (500)

(15)

Round 1,155 to the nearest ten. (1,160)

(16)

Round 1,155 to the nearest hundred (1,200)

(17)

Round 1,155 to the nearest thousand. (1,000)

(18)

Which of the following numbers does not round to 550 when rounding to the nearest ten: 551, 555, 552, 554? (555)

(19)

Round to the nearest thousand: 8,095. (8,000)

(20)

Which of the following numbers does not round to 1,000: 985, 999, 972, 954, 949. (949)

(21)

Your number is 842. Round off to the nearest:

100: 800

10: 840

(22)

Your number is 846. Round off to the nearest:

100: 800

10: 850

(23)

Your number is 876. Round off to the nearest:

100: 900

10: 880

(24)

Your number is 8461. Round off to the nearest:

Thousands: 8,000

Hundreds: 8,500

Tens: 8,460

(25)

Your number is 8688. Round off to the nearest:

Thousands: 9,000

Hundreds: 8,700

Tens: 8,690

 

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