3rd Grade - 3rd Grade Reading Aloud

 
     
 
     
 
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3rd
Speaking
3rd grade reading aloud
Read prose and poetry aloud with fluency, rhythm, and pace, using appropriate intonation and vocal patterns to emphasize important passages of the text being read.
Student can identify a poem. Student knows that a poem is read differently than other types of text. Student knows to look for clues like line breaks and punctuation marks in the poem determine how it should be read.
 

Sample Problems

(1)

What is poetry?

(2)

How should poetry be read?

(3)

What clues can I look for in a poem to help me know how to read it?

(4)

Am I reading the poem fluently?

(5)

Am I reading the poem at the correct pace?

Learning Tips

(1)

Once children get older, poetry is not used as much in the classroom as the focus becomes more on informational texts and longer reading passages. Make sure your child is still exposed to poetry at home. Go to your local library or bookstore and find a fun collection of poems to read together.

(2)

If your child is having a hard time reading a poem with proper fluency and intonation, make a copy of the text. Read the text with your child. Have your child reread to practice.

(3)

Writing poetry is also a great way for children to get practice with poems. After reading a poem that your child really likes, suggest that they write a poem in the style of the poem they like.

(4)

Libraries, bookstores, and coffee shops will often offer poetry readings. Find one that is appropriate for children and attend with your child.

(5)

If your child is having a hard time reading poetry, encourage your child to look at punctuation and line breaks to help them with fluency, pacing, and intonation.

Extra Help Problems

(1)

Click on the link below and then read “The Tiger Asks Blake for a Bedtime Story”. Then answer questions 1-5.


http://library.thinkquest.org/J0112392/alliterationclassics.html


Practice reading the poem and then read to aloud to another person in the house with good fluency and pacing.

(2)

When should you make a short pause in the first stanza?

(3)

What does the break between the first stanza and second stanza tell you to do?

(4)

Why do you think every line in the first stanza has the same amount of syllables?

(5)

What pattern do you see in the number of syllables in the last stanza?

(6)

Click on the link below and then read “Firefly”. Then answer questions 6-10.


http://www.dcrafts.com/insectspoems.htm


Practice reading the poem and then read to aloud to another person in the house with good fluency and pacing.

(7)

Where is the first short pause in the poem?

(8)

When is the first long pause in the poem?

(9)

Why do you think the first two lines in the poem have the same amount of syllables?

(10)

What pattern do you seen in the third line and sixth line?

(11)

Click on the link below and then read “Only My Opinion”. Then answer questions 11-15.


http://www.dcrafts.com/insectspoems.htm


Practice reading the poem and then read to aloud to another person in the house with good fluency and pacing.

(12)

The mood of this poem is: A) silly B) sad

(13)

When is the first pause in the poem?

(14)

Since the lines in the poem have different amount of syllables, how will this affect the pace at which we read?

(15)

What pattern do you see in the third line?

(16)

Click on the link below and then read “Fuzzy Wuzzy Caterpillar”. Then answer questions 16-20.


http://www.dcrafts.com/insectspoems.htm


Practice reading the poem and then read to aloud to another person in the house with good fluency and pacing.

(17)

When is the first pause in the poem?

(18)

What are the first two rhyming words you see in the poem?

(19)

What pattern do you notice in the first line of each stanza?

(20)

The mood of the poem is: A) happy B) scary

(21)

Click on the link below and then read “Caterpillars”. Then answer questions 21-25.


http://www.dcrafts.com/insectspoems.htm


Practice reading the poem and then read to aloud to another person in the house with good fluency and pacing.

(22)

When is the first pause in the poem?

(23)

Why do you think the first four lines have the same amount of syllables?

(24)

Why does the writer repeat the words chew?

(25)

When is the second pause in the poem?

 

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