3rd Grade - Reading Aloud In 3rd Grade

 
     
 
     
 
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3rd
Speaking
Reading aloud in 3rd grade
Read aloud narrative and expository text fluently and accurately and with appropriate pacing, intonation, and expression.
By the end of third grade, students should be reading 100 words per minute. In order for comprehension to develop, it is important that they read at a pace equivalent to talking. Students should also pay attention to punctuation and context to decide what the intonation and expression should be for a particular passage.
 

Sample Problems

(1)

How many words can you read in one minute?

(2)

Are you understanding what you’re reading as you’re reading?

(3)

What does ending punctuation tell us to do when we read?

(4)

What does a comma tell us to do when we read?

(5)

Are you reading with an expression that matches what is happening in the story?

Learning Tips

(1)

Have your child read at home daily. Have them read a couple of minutes aloud to you before they put their book away.

(2)

When your child reads at home with you do a basic comprehension check. Ask them to summarize what they read or to tell you something they found interesting.

(3)

Many teachers do fluency checks at school. Try preparing your child for a testing setting by timing them for one minute as they read. Keep track of where they started and ended so you can count how many words they read in a minute. An average third grader should read about 100 words per minute.

(4)

If their reading is choppy, have them practice reading the same page multiple times until their pace is equivalent to talking.

(5)

Oftentimes students may choose books that are too hard and this may interfere with their fluency. If you feel like your child is reading a book that is too hard have them read a page aloud. If they make more than five mistakes, then they should choose another book.

Extra Help Problems

(1)

Read a page from your free reading book. Write a paragraph telling about what you read.

(2)

Read a page from your free reading book aloud to a partner. Have them tell you when a minute is up. Count up how many words you read in one minute.

(3)

Read a page from your free reading book aloud to a partner. Tell them in your own words what the page was about.

(4)

If a sentence ends in a period, should you read the sentence like you’re: excited, asking a question, or telling? Circle the correct answer.

(5)

If a sentence ends in a question mark, should you read the sentence like you’re: excited, asking a question, or telling? Circle the correct answer.

(6)

If a sentence ends in an exclamation point, should you read the sentence like you’re: excited, asking a question, or telling? Circle the correct answer.

(7)

If you are reading and you see a comma you should: pause, read faster, or ignore it? Circle the correct answer.

(8)

You should read like you’re excited when you see a: comma, period, exclamation point, or question mark. Circle the correct answer.

(9)

You should read like you’re telling when you see a: comma, period, exclamation point, or question mark. Circle the correct answer.

(10)

You should read like you’re asking a question when you see a: comma, period, exclamation point, or question mark. Circle the correct answer.

(11)

You should pause in the middle of a sentence when you see a: comma, period, exclamation point, or question mark. Circle the correct answer.

(12)

Read the following sentence: It’s my birthday! You should read it like you’re: telling, asking a question, or with excitement. Circle the correct answer.

(13)

Read the following sentence: What time is it? You should read it like you’re: telling, asking a question, or with excitement. Circle the correct answer.

(14)

Read the following sentence: I went to the store. You should read it like you’re: telling, asking a question, or with excitement. Circle the correct answer.

(15)

Read a page from Charlotte’s Web. Write a paragraph telling about what you read.

(16)

Read a page from Charlotte’s Web aloud to a partner. Have them tell you when a minute is up. Count up how many words you read in one minute.

(17)

Read a page from Charlotte’s Web aloud to a partner. Tell them in your own words what the page was about.

(18)

Read a page from Sarah Plain and Tall. Write a paragraph telling about what you read.

(19)

Read a page from Sarah Plain and Tall aloud to a partner. Have them tell you when a minute is up. Count up how many words you read in one minute.

(20)

Read a page from Sarah Plain and Tall aloud to a partner. Tell them in your own words what the page was about.

(21)

Read a page from Pippi Longstocking. Write a paragraph telling about what you read.

(22)

Read a page from Pippi Longstocking to a partner. Have them tell you when a minute is up. Count up how many words you read in one minute.

(23)

Read a page from Pippi Longstocking aloud to a partner. Tell them in your own words what the page was about.

(24)

Read the following sentence: We had so much fun! You should read it like you’re: telling, asking a question, or with excitement. Circle the correct answer.

(25)

Read the following sentence: Did you see that movie? You should read it like you’re: telling, asking a question, or with excitement. Circle the correct answer.

 

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